" /> ATCOG – Revolving Loan Fund Plan – EastTexasRadio.com
Sandlin – Find New Roads – It’s All About You Aug 2017
Access Financial Group
Momentum Polaris Spring Sales Event 2020
Hess Lawn Mower Header
Mark Patrick Header Virtual 2020
Lakes Regional Community Center Header
cypress basin hospice
Morrell banner

ATCOG – Revolving Loan Fund Plan

NORTHEAST TEXAS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT
REVOLVING LOAN FUND PLAN

May 2018
Revised 7/2/2019
Drafted to include CTEDD RLF portfolio transfer on 11/18/2019

INTRODUCTION

Under Title IX of the Public Works and Economic Development Act of 1967, as amended, the
Economic Development Administration, hereinafter called EDA, may assist distressed areas
experiencing long-term economic deterioration or areas threatened or impacted by severe
economic dislocation. The Revolving Loan Fund Plan was developed in accordance with EDA
Directive No. 17.07 dated 7/10/89 and the updated EDA Guidelines dated March 14, 2018. As
adopted, the RLF Plan has become the Standard Operating Procedure for North East Texas
Economic Development District, Inc., hereinafter called NETEDD in administering a revolving
loan fund program in areas experiencing long-term economic deterioration, and/or severe
economic dislocation. Both exemplified in part by high or excessive unemployment rates relative
to surrounding areas and the state. The Revolving Loan Plan is divided into two parts. The first
covers the strategy of the RLF Plan and the second covers the operational procedures.

PART I. THE REVOLVING LOAN FUND STRATEGY
(i) Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Overview
The North East Texas Economic Development District (NETEDD) consists of eleven counties in
the “Right Corner of Texas” or the far northeastern part of the state. This eleven-county region
including Bowie, Cass, Camp, Delta, Franklin, Hopkins, Lamar, Marion, Morris, Red River and
Titus counties cover a geographical area of almost 6,547 square miles and is home to
approximately 304,748 people. NOTE: Both Camp and Marion counties are currently undergoing
EDA approval for realignment from NETEDD to East Texas Economic Development District
(ETEDD). This action is being pursued because both of these counties are geographically
contiguous to the ETEDD and currently operate under the East Texas Council of Governments
(ETCOG) and have requested the aforementioned realignment. Consequently, the NETEDD
region will be reduced to nine counties upon approval by the EDA.

In addition to the original counties of NETEDD, pending approval from EDA for a transfer of RLF
Funds from CTEDD, an additional 14 counties will be added to our service area for RLF Funding.
These 14 counties include Bell, Bosque, Coryell, Ellis, Falls, Freestone, Hamilton, Hill, Johnson,
Limestone, McLennan, Navarro, Milam, and Somervell. The aforementioned counties are served

Page 1 of 178
by three different CEDS. In an effort to maintain the purpose of the funding, NETEDD staff will
review the CEDS and annual updates for each of the areas covered.
In consideration of the size of the district, the Board and staff relied on a variety of resources and
partners to obtain input into the 2018 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS)
Report. Meetings with partners were used as a springboard to evoke discussion of economic
development issues affecting the region. These partners provide the information that is an
an integral part of this report and include:
Community and Private Sector Participation
• Members of the North East Texas Economic Developers Roundtable (NETEDR) were
vital to the initial planning process. A Roundtable is a group of professionals interested
in economic development in North East Texas. The professionals come from city, county,
and state governments, private developers and consultants, utilities, non-profits, and quasi-governmental units such as Councils of Governments and River Authorities. The regular,
open meetings are held in different communities in the district and serve as a forum for
the exchange of ideas and information related to economic development in North East
Texas. The Roundtable’s website http://therightcorner.com/ contains information about
available sites for development and community profiles for the region,
• Elected officials from counties and cities in NETEDD region were involved in the process,
• City managers/Economic Development Administrators/Chambers of Commerce staff
and Board members were involved,
• Northeast Texas Workforce Commission Staff and Board members were primary
contributors,
• The Ark-Tex Council of Governments staff and board members were an essential source
of information,
• Local Community Leaders from Educational and Religious organizations provided
information concerning their communities,
• Major Business Owners from various areas within the Region gave input and
information.

STRENGTHS
The strengths that were reported for the NETEDD region in the 2013 CEDS Report continue
in 2018 as strong attributes for the region:
• Affordable housing,
• Good water resources,
• Available land for development,
• Available workforce,
• Existing educational institutions such as universities, community colleges, and technical
Page 2 of 178
schools,
• Good natural resources,
• A location along transportation corridors/crossroads for major highways,
• Adequate hospitals and other medical facilities,
• Fairly good industrial diversity,
• Growth potential in agribusiness, logistics, and ecotourism.

WEAKNESSES
Many of the weaknesses that were reported in 2013 continue to plague the NETEDD region as
well in 2018:
• Relatively low wage levels,
• Higher than state average mortality rates, illiteracy rates, and poverty rates,
• Aging population [According to Texas Dept. of Aging estimates, approximately 14% of
those over the age of 60 live in poverty],
• Unemployment rates are higher than the state average,
• Disability rates are higher than the state average,
• Per capita income is lower than state and nation,
• The average value of owned homes is low,
• Educational attainment rates are low,
• Shortage of highly skilled labor,
• Job growth is slow,
• New business growth is low,
• Infrastructure is aging and inadequate,
• Public transportation and air transportation are inadequate,
• There are environmental concerns in some areas.

GROWTH SECTORS
The logical growth sectors for the NETEDD economy include healthcare, forest products and
added value agriculture and distribution centers because of geographic location and
transportation opportunities. Some of the Industry Clusters that exist or could exist in the region
include:
• Forest products,
• Added value forest products manufacturing,
• Petroleum,
• Poultry,
• Medical Districts,
• Manufacturer, Trucking Facilities and Distribution Centers,
• Prison Facilities

NETEDD REGIONAL BACKGROUND ECONOMICS
Page 3 of 178
The overall economy in the NETEDD Region continues to grow slowly, but naturally at a higher
momentum, in the more populated communities with interstate highway or corridor highway
access. Communities with attributes such as Texarkana (Bowie County), Paris (Lamar County),
Sulphur Springs (Hopkins County) and Mt. Pleasant (Titus County) have all seen the benefits of
multiple industrial and retail expansions and relocations over the past five years. Unfortunately,
many of the rural communities and rural portions of the NETEDD counties, which continue to be
dependent upon agriculture and commuting to employment, are still plagued with high
unemployment and stagnant population growth or population decline.

The vision for North East Texas has changed little from the days of Representative Wright Patman.
He was credited with saying that he wanted to see residents in his part of Texas earn at the national
average, be educated at the national average and have fewer than the national average
living below the poverty level. North East Texas has made changes and improvements but
our vision remains to have a workforce that is competitive nationally, earn wages at the national
average, and relieve the burden of poverty from as many residents as possible.

Goals Measurable Outcomes Objective

Increased involvement with local governments and businesses to promote the economic development of the
region.

Number of jobs created in measurable period and/or number of projects resulting in job retention; the number of technical assistance visits made on job creation/retention projects; decreased unemployment in the
region.

Assist the local government is planning to support economic development and leadership development that results in lower unemployment and poverty rates in the local community and the region.

Development of higher educated, skilled and technological workforce ready to fill the employment needs of new and existing businesses.

Increase in per capita income, decrease in unemployment and an increase in skilled and semi-skilled jobs.

Raise the standard of living for residents of the region by emphasizing higher education
& technical skills as a route to higher wages.

Adequate infrastructure for residential, commercial, and industrial growth.

Increased accessibility & the capacity of basic utilities, growth in industrial parks and other public works
needs.

A decrease in the number of residents living at or below the national poverty rate in substandard housing; increase
per capita income through additional job creation and retention.

Page 4 of 178
Provide assistance to governmental entities in region to promote economic development.

Number of EDA proposals submitted during the fiscal year; the number of technical assistance visits to
communities during the fiscal year; completed CEDS for the region.

Provide planning and technical assistance to communities in the region that results in new businesses or expansion & job creation.

Make affordable financing available to businesses in the region for expansion.

Number of loans outstanding in NETEDD RLF, SBA 504, ETRAP RLF, Chapman RLF & Microloan portfolios.

Source of economic development finance programs for small businesses and local Economic Development
Corporations.

(ii) The Business Development Strategy

The business development strategy is already well documented in the NETEDD CEDS Report and the Ark-Tex Regional Development Company (ATRDC) Annual Report (SBA Certified Development Company). The NETEDD staff has a close working relationship with the business the sector in designing and implementing the business development strategy that initially enabled NETEDD to determine the need for an RLF and define the types of RLF investments that would be most effective in complementing other types of business assistance in supporting the objectives of the CEDS program.

A priority objective is to provide technical assistance and financing to help small & medium-sized manufacturing plants start-up, expand, or increase productivity. Increased use of technology and the expansion of markets through exporting are strategic objectives to help keep local firms competitive.

Types of assistance identified and targeted in Northeast Texas include:

1) Management & business assistance from Small Business Development Centers (including ATRDC/NETEDD);

2) Production and Engineering assistance from the Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center network
stationed in Longview;

3) Seminars in International Trade co-sponsored by NETEDD and the Northeast Texas Economic Developers Roundtable; and

4) Financial assistance provided by NETEDD/ATRDC.

The following are among those activities for which a loan may be made from the RLF:
 The establishment or expansion of businesses engaged in commercial, industrial or agricultural activities, such as farming, manufacturing, construction, sales, service;
 The establishment or expansion of cooperatives engaged in the production and marketing of farm products, equipment, or supplies; the manufacture and sale of industrial, commercial or consumer products; or the provision of various commercial services;
 Business or job retention;
 Small business development;
Page 5 of 178
 Private-sector job creation; and
 Promotion of economic diversification, e.g. targeting firms in growth industries that have not previously been part of a community’s economic base Prohibited uses of RLF capital are listed below. See 13 CFR 307.17(b). Acquire an equity position in private business;
 Subsidization of interest payments on an existing RLF loan;
 Provide for borrowers’ required equity contributions under other Federal Agencies’ loan
programs;
 Enable borrowers to acquire an interest in a business either through the purchase of stock or through the acquisition of assets unless sufficient justification is provided in the loan documentation. Sufficient justification may include acquiring a business to save it from imminent closure or to acquire a business to facilitate a significant expansion or increase in investment with a significant increase in jobs. The potential economic benefits must be
clearly consistent with the strategic objectives of the RLF;
 Provide RLF loans to a borrower for the purpose of investing in interest-bearing accounts, certificates of deposit or any investment unrelated to the RLF; or
 Refinance existing debt, unless:
 The RLF Recipient sufficiently demonstrates in the loan documentation a “sound economic justification” for the refinancing (e.g., the refinancing will support additional capital investment intended to increase business activities). For this purpose, reducing the risk of loss to an existing lender(s) or lowering the cost of financing to a borrower shall not, without other indicia, constitute a sound economic justification; or
 RLF Capital will finance the purchase of the rights of a prior lien holder during a foreclosure action which is necessary to preclude a significant loss on an RLF loan. RLF Capital may be used for this purpose only if there is a high probability of receiving compensation from the sale of assets sufficient to cover an RLF’s costs plus a reasonable
a portion of the outstanding RLF loan within a reasonable period of time, as determined by EDA, following the date of refinancing.

(iii)The Financing Strategy
Banking institutions throughout the NETEDD generally have conservative lending policies. Financial institutions almost uniformly showed gains in deposits and these statistics contrasted to other area economic indicators; viz., excessive unemployment rates and losses in personal income, and loan to deposit ratios generally in the fifty percent (50%) range indicate conservative lending policies.

In general, area lenders are reluctant to participate in high-risk ventures or provide needed long term financing. Normally, local lending institutions require a 20 percent to 30 percent equity investment for applicants in a relatively strong financial position and with sufficient managerial experience in the industry or business. For new ventures and closely held companies, the equity requirement may be as much as 50 percent, if the loan is considered at all. Specialized equipment and technology-based loans for manufacturers needing to upgrade to remain globally competitive.

Page 6 of 178 are hard to finance conventionally. The NETEDD RLF in conjunction with the area banks has
been successful in filling this need. Most of the area lending institutions are innovative and utilize applicable loan supplement programs as needed; SBA-7 (a), SBA-504, and loan guarantee programs from the SBA and the
USDA. The NETEDD RLF has proven to be another valuable financial tool that helps marginal projects become more attractive to private lenders by reducing the amount of exposure.

The utilization of the NETEDD RLF has strengthened the economic base of the areas within the District which suffer from severe economic distress. The NETEDD RLF Plan has worked with local economic development organizations with an emphasis on Bowie County to help diversify away from defense facilities and recover from associated job losses.
Some areas have more on-going economic development activities than others, but the problems causing economic distress are present in all areas. This economic distress is reflected by out-migration, unemployment and underemployment, loss of personal income, lack of industrial diversification and lack of facilities and capital to stimulate and sustain economic development. It must be noted that the levels of distress are chronic and fluctuate directly with the rise and fall of economic activity within NETEDD’s major industries; hospitality, defense, and related industries.

The following financial policies are presented to serve a standard by which individual loans are
tested and evaluated in order to achieve the goals and objectives of this plan:
1. Working capital loans will not exceed 50% of the total amount of loans in the RLF
Portfolio;
2. Loan size – Minimum $10,000 up to a maximum of $300,000;
3. In general, principal and interest will be amortized over the life of the loan. However, in
order to encourage participation in a direct fixed asset loan by other lenders and investors,
the RLF loan principal may be payable after other loans made in connection with the project
have been repaid in full. It must be noted that each loan will be negotiated on an individual
basis in order to generate maximum impact;
4. The interest rate on RLF loans will follow the rates allowed by the RLF grant. The minimum interest rate will be limited to four (4) percentage points below the current money center prime rate quoted in the Wall Street Journal or the maximum interest rate allowed under state law, whichever is lower but will not be less than four (4) percent. However, should the prime interest rate exceed fourteen (14) percent, the minimum RLF interest rate may be limited to ten (10) percent if this would compromise the ability of the RLF to implement the overall financing strategy? The target rate will be the amount current money center prime rate fixed over the life of the loan;
5. Moratoriums on RLF principal may be established for the short run as needed in order to meet the credit needs of the borrower and further the goals and objectives of the RLF Program;
6. Wherever possible, the NETEDD will always strive to take a superior lien position. However, the Board may take a lien position for the RLF which may be subordinate and make inferior to lien or lien securing other loans made in connection with the project, on Page 7 of 178 order to achieve the RLF goals. In determining the collateral requirements, NETEDD, in conjunction with participating lending institutions, will consider the merits and potential
economic benefits of each individual loan request. RLF loans will be secured by liens and/or assignments of rights and benefits of the mortgagor. In projects involving fixed asset loans, the RLF will normally require collateral such as liens on the fixed assets, evidenced by loan documents to include but not be limited to notes, mortgages and deeds
of trust, and security in interest;
7. A loan origination fee of 1.5% targeted for each loan. The following items are needed for standard loan application and processing:
• Financial Information and Credit Report Authorization and Release Form
• CAIVRS Disclosure Form
• SAMS Clearance
• Personal History Form
• Personal Financial Statement Form
• Standard Loan Application
• Business Financials and/or projections (as needed)

Civil Rights Requirements

The NETEDD RLF will comply with all Department of Commerce and Economic Development Administration regulations under Title VI of the C.R. Act of 1964, Section 112 of Public Law 92-65, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 all as amended. Any other applicable non-discrimination law(s). NETEDD RLF will require the same Assurances of Compliance from all loan recipients. All applicants will be required to submit a policy statement that such applicant shall not discriminate against employees or applicants for employment on the basis of race, creed, religion, national origin, sex, handicap, or political belief or affiliation. Applicants will be required to post a non-discrimination notice in areas where such notice will be seen by employees and applicants.

Such notice will provide information for persons to report such discrimination who feel they have been discriminated against by the applicant. Loan recipient compliance will be monitored semi-annually and will require corrective action as necessary. Corrective action may require applicants to submit a workforce analysis showing hiring patterns of affected groups and projected employment figures aimed at remedying underutilized minorities.

The NETEDD RLF shall not discriminate against loan applicants on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, or sex. All applicable statutes, executive orders, requirements, and regulations pertaining to non-discrimination will be adhered to by NETEDD RLF.

The NETEDD RLF will require assurance in writing from loan recipients that affirmative action in the area of contracting will be taken to involve minority and/or female-owned businesses.

The NETEDD RLF will work to further the cause of minority business development by encouraging applicants for funding by NETEDD RLF. The NETEDD RLF will work with Page 8 of 178 minority business organizations, such as the Texarkana Black Chamber of Commerce, the local Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE) and the local Small Business Development Center, and other organizations working for minority business development, and encourage their referrals of potential loan applicants.

The monitoring of loan recipients on a regular basis will be used to ensure compliance. If patterns of discrimination are found with a loan recipient, and efforts to force corrective action are unsuccessful, the loan will be classified as a problem loan and if corrective action is not taken the loan may be declared in default of loan covenants.

The standards outlined below reflect the expected achievement of the RLF portfolio. Individual loans will generally conform to these standards but may vary depending on the economic benefits, both direct and indirect, to be achieved by each loan as long as cumulative results of the portfolio generally meet specified standards.

• The overall cost per job is targeted at the SBA rate of one job created for every $65,000 loaned though in some instances cost per job will be less than the indicated amount. This amount will be adjusted periodically to coincide with the SBA job creation requirement. The cost per job requirements tended to focus on the number of jobs rather than the quality of jobs. Increased costs of upgrading plant and equipment to keep pace with advances in technology to remain competitive make the job retention a worthy public policy objective. The maximum loan to any single borrower is set at $300,000, with EDA approval.

Page 9 of 178
• Due to the high level of long-term unemployed and underemployed workers in the NETEDD area, 50% of the new jobs created will be targeted at the long-term unemployed and/or underemployed workers.
• The RLF will continue to focus on economic base jobs or basic value-added jobs. These types of jobs tend to have a more positive impact on the area than do service jobs. A manufacturing job usually generates additional cash flow which creates market demand and generates additional supplier and service jobs. Most of the dislocated workers in
NETEDD filled basic job slots and were classified as semi-skilled and skilled industrial workers. RLF loan activity will be targeted but not limited to replenishing these types of jobs which will have the most economic impact on the area. The target ratios for semi-skilled and skilled workers are: Industrial – 60%, Commercial – 40%, Entry
level -25%, Semiskilled -25%, Skilled – 50%.
• There is a gap in the lending practices of the local lending institutions for commercial loans less than $25,000. The local lending environment generally views the smaller loans as unprofitable ventures due to the cost of servicing the loans. The revolving loan fund will be used to address this weakness in the local lending environment while keeping the same priorities as larger loans. However, since the local lending institutions have an aversion to making the smaller loans, there will probably not be any private leveraging of the RLF funds. This will probably result in the RLF financing 100% of the project. This leveraging shortfall will be made up by leveraging the larger loans in an amount that should make the overall portfolio average in the 3 – 5:1 range.
• The rates of private-sector dollars to be leveraged by the RLF Portfolio will be set at an overall average of two to one (2:1). It is expected a majority of the loans will leverage private sector funds in the 3-5:1 range.
• All loan applications will be analyzed with a maximum positive impact on the economy considered the primary factor. As such, the ratio of public/private borrowers and locally owned or outside concerns are irrelevant. RLF loans must be used for purposes which result in private-sector job creation or retention and contribute to the economic development of the area. Loans will normally finance industrial or commercial activities including light manufacturing and service industries where opportunities for private-sector jobs are the greatest and will emphasize direct job creation or retention, location or expansion of established business, new start-up or the retention of business. In some instances, indirect job creation may be considered on a low priority basis, but only with a significant impact on the economy.
• Proclamation of the RLF will ensure that the program is known to all potential loan applicants including minorities and women. Through the judicious use of the RLF, financing can be provided to those businesses and industries that indeed offer the most long-term gains for the area. The NETEDD can ensure maximum gains for various areas
by tailoring to meet the different needs of each locale.
• In small rural areas, revolving loan financing would most likely be to labor-intensive Page 10 of 178
industries offering the quickest relief to severe unemployment problems. In the larger, more urbanized areas, financing would be targeted at developments that would leverage major business expansions and start-ups providing a continuing source of new jobs. Every effort will be made to ensure that the loan portfolio will increase the tax revenues in all eligible areas involved with the RLF program.
• The NETEDD Loan Committee and the loan candidate will be appraised of the state and federal statutes concerning civil rights and environmental regulations. Loan reviews and applications will require statutory compliance as a part of the terms and conditions of the loan. The required selection criteria that financing is not otherwise available will be applied to all loans. The economic impact criteria are that the business be classified as a basic industry or other
value-added business or support to a value-added business. The staff will make an annual report to the NETEDD RLF Committee to assess the performance of the RLF in accomplishing its stated economic adjustment objectives and to modify the RLF Plan as needed and recertify the plan.

PART II. OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
(i) Administrative Procedures
The staff of NETEDD, including contract labor, will be responsible for the identification and development of appropriate financing opportunities, providing business and financial counseling, performing environmental review compliance, and loan management. NETEDD staff will also render loan servicing functions which will include, but not be limited to, performing credit analysis, loan write-ups and recommendations to the Committee, loan processing, collections and servicing, handling defaulted loans and foreclosures, and compliance with grant requirements.

Loan closings and foreclosures will be handled by outside legal counsel. Loan procedures and
documents are in compliance with the RLF Administrative Manual.

The NETEDD RLF loan committee is composed of the NETEDD President and some of the ATRDC Executive Board (which also reviews SBA 504 program loans). This structure allows for administrative efficiency and competency in loan reviews. This loan committee is composed of five members who are representative of the public and private sector as well as minority representation. Members with business experience that might have a conflict of interest on a particular project must abstain from voting on that project. The board has members with bank lending experience and at least one of those members must be present for each loan decision.

Quorum is set at three members and there must be a quorum to vote on a project. The staff of the NETEDD will serve as the initial contact person for all NETEDD RLF applicants. If a prospective applicant appears to meet the criteria for a loan, the staff shall provide the prospect with a loan application packet, and assist them as necessary to comply with the requirements of the application. When completed the application and all supporting documentation will be returned Page 11 of 178 to the NETEDD office where the staff will examine it for completeness as well as further eligibility screening.

Credit Reports
The credit analysis of the loan application is a process designed to determine whether the loan the applicant has adequate financial resources to repay the loan as outlined in the application. NETEDD utilizes the generic loan application used by the Ark-Tex Regional Development Co., Inc., (an SBA chartered Certified Development Company), to obtain all of the information needed for a thorough credit analysis of the proposed project. The credit analysis of this information will answer the following questions:
• Is cash flow sufficient to repay the loan?
• Is working capital adequate, or have adequate sources of working capital been identified?
• Is the balance sheet satisfactory?
• Do trends and projections support the loan request?
• Is the loan being recommended?

All information submitted to commercial financial institutions will be made available to NETEDD to ensure completeness, and when necessary NETEDD may use outside credit analysts to supplement analysis was done by the staff. It is anticipated that the assistance of the RLF Committee members with loan experience will greatly enhance the analysis of each loan, and these individuals will be asked to take an active role in this phase of the loan process.
Appraisal Reports Appraisal reports commissioned by the participating financial institutions shall generally be used
by the RLF. If the financial institution does not need a formal appraisal and the RLF feels one is needed for its protection, a licensed appraiser shall be utilized.

(ii) Environmental Review
NETEDD will require written certification and conformance with all applicable state and federal guidelines concerning environmental review. NETEDD will develop and implement an environmental review process in accordance with the intent of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (P.L. 91-190), as implemented by the “Regulations” of the President’s Council on Environmental Quality (40 DFR Parts 1500-1508). An Environmental Review Record (ERR) will be established for each loan, and the applicant or borrower must comply with all RLF environmental requirements.

In administering the RLF, NETEDD will maintain procedures to comply with applicable environmental laws and statutes including, but not limited to, the following:
• The Clean Air Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.).
• The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (U.S.C. 1251, et seq.).
• The Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, P.L. 92-583, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1451, et seq.).

Page 12 of 178
• Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management (May 24, 1977), and regulations and guidelines issued thereunder by the Economic Development Administration.
• Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands (May 24, 1977).
• The Endangered Species Act of 1973, P.L. 93-205, as amended (16 U.S.C. 300f et seq.).
• The Safe Drinking Water Act, P.L. 93-523, as amended (42 U.S.C. 300f-300j-9).
• The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1271, et seq.).
• The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976
• The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), P.L. 96-510, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA0942 U.S.C. 6091, et seq.)
• The National Historic Preservation Act P.L. 89-665 (16 U.S.C. 470, et seq.), (36 CFR Part 800).
• All state and local environmental requirements will be applicable along with Federal standards.

Reasonable assurances must be provided by the applicant that the loan proceeds will not be used to substitute for private capital. These assurances will include execution of the Bank Commitment Letter and Bank Certification of Surplus Asset Unavailability. In addition, personal financial statements will be reviewed in order to determine the availability and accessibility of private capital.

In determining collateral requirements for each loan the Board will give consideration to each project’s individual merits and the economic benefits derived from the project. The Board shall generally follow the guidelines listed below in making this determination.
• Fixed asset loans shall be limited in duration to the useful life of the fixed asset or the collateral securing the loan
• The equity requirement for each project will generally be 20% of the total project cost.
• In order to encourage the participation of other lenders in a fixed asset loan, he NETEDD may take a subordinate position to other loans made in connection with the project.
• Loans for working capital will normally be secured by liens on inventories, receivables, or other assets available. Such liens may be subordinate only to existing liens of record and other loans involved in the project.
• In addition to the above types of security, NETEDD may also require security in the form of assignment of patents and licenses, the acquisition of hazard insurance, and any other form of security deemed appropriate by the NETEDD RLF Board.
• If determined appropriate the NETEDD RLF Board may require life insurance on key persons to be assigned to NETEDD RLF loan. Personal guarantees will also be required from principal owners.

The equity requirement for each project involving a new company will generally be 20% of the total project cost either for working capital or fixed asset loans. Equity requirements for existing companies may be lower if the company has a substantial equity position.

When a determination is made concerning eligibility the staff will prepare a written and oral report for the NETEDD RLF Loan Committee covering:
Page 13 of 178
• Eligibility
• Creditworthiness
• Collateral recommended
• How prospective loan will help NETEDD RLF meet program objectives
• How prospective loan will fit with loan portfolio guidelines
• Any special Loan conditions that are recommended
• Any other information deemed pertinent to the review process
• Recommendation on approval or disapproval of the application

If the loan is recommended for disapproval, the report should also indicate how the loan might be modified to make it an acceptable package for the NETEDD RLF Loan Committee to approve. The report should also indicate other potential sources of funding if the loan is denied, and what steps the staff will take to assist the applicant in these alternative processes.

The loan write-up is presented to the NETEDD RLF Loan Committee along with an oral staff presentation and recommendation. Following the presentation, the Committee will consider each application and vote on the recommended action. Minutes are kept of all Committee meetings.

Loan applicants are notified of the decision immediately following the meeting and a written confirmation will follow.
A copy of a bank deposit slip will be required to document any equity requirement of the applicant.
A loan commitment letter from the participating financial institution will be required for closing.
Where applicable, the following documents must be provided at or prior to closing any loan:
Borrower Provides to NETEDD:
• Articles of incorporation and bylaws for the borrower
• Corporate resolution authorizing borrower’s President to execute loan documents
• Certificate of Good Standing from the Comptroller of Public Accounts
• Certificate of Existence from Secretary of State
• Lease agreement with the property owner
• Landlord’s lien waiver
• The legal description of the property occupied by the owner
• Life insurance on the borrower in the amount of the loan (to be assigned to NETEDD-RLF as additional collateral for the loan)
• List of current employees by name and job title for job certification
• Evidence of equity injection
• Disclosure agreement letter
• The appropriate fire extended coverage or liability insurance (policy or binder) on equipment, materials to be purchased with loan proceeds listing NETEDD-RLF as Loss Payee.
• Funds sufficient to cover closing costs including, but not limited to, legal/attorney fees, filing fees, lien searches, other fees included in closing costs such as appraisal fees or environmental assessment fees

Page 14 of 178
Loan Disbursement
After addressing loan requirements and securing collateral (as necessary for each individual loan), loan disbursement is paid out in the form of a single lump-sum payment via check and delivered to the borrower or sent via FedEx with signature required.

The NETEDD-RLF is responsible for the administration, monitoring, compliance, and the servicing of the total loan project from loan inception through full payment. The NETEDD-RLF has a general collection, investing, disbursing, individual loan accounting and reporting responsibilities. The NETEDD-RLF also has responsibility for monitoring, administration, and overall reporting requirements. The NETEDD-RLF is responsible for taking whatever steps are
necessary to bring delinquent loans current and to take any other steps necessary to protect NETEDD-RLF capital.

The NETEDD-RLF is responsible for all aspects of administration, monitoring, and servicing. This will include the following tasks:
• Periodic visits to the borrower to review the condition and maintenance of the collateral as well as compliance with any special provisions.
• Obtain and analyze the borrower’s annual financial statements and review the results with the borrower.
• Monitor the loan agreement for defaults in covenants.
• Negotiate with the borrower if changes in terms, conditions, or covenants of the loan become necessary.
• Notification of default and initiating foreclosure proceedings and taking whatever steps are necessary to safeguard collateral.

It is the intent of the NETEDD-RLF to work with each borrower to ensure the fulfillment of the loan obligations and to protect the interests of the NETEDD-RLF. Borrowers are required to submit reports as requested to prove job creation in line with the RLF commitment. The borrower is required to submit Financial Statements in accordance with each borrower’s loan terms and conditions. The NETEDD-RLF staff makes periodic on-site visits to check the status of collateral. The NETEDD-RLF staff also contacts the borrower periodically to identify any potential problems the business might be having.

The NETEDD-RLF staff shall make periodic monthly reports to the Loan Committee concerning each outstanding loan. The reports shall show the current payment status of each loan. The following procedures will be followed when accounts become past due:
• Accounts become past due when a scheduled payment is ten (10) days past due. A late charge of five percent (5%) will be charged on accounts of more than fifteen (15) days delinquent.
• When a loan becomes ten (10) days past due, a late notice will be sent by the staff.
• When a loan becomes twenty (20) days past due, the staff will make personal contact and attempt to determine the reason for the delinquency.

Page 15 of 178
• Loans will be classified as problem loans when a payment is not made when default on a loan covenant has occurred, or when the borrower’s financial statements reveal an adverse change which at some point could cause either non-payment or default.

In working with a borrower to keep the loan in good standing, the NETEDD-RLF staff will maintain frequent contact with each borrower. Any problems and concerns in the above-listed areas will be discussed in-depth to determine feasible solutions. The Loan Administration Board will be kept fully informed at all times of the status of problem loans and the actions taken by NETEDD-RLF personnel to rectify the problem. If a change in the loan terms can save the loan, the Committee is authorized to make any changes necessary that are in accordance with EDA
guidelines.

When a loan becomes ninety (90) days past due and all efforts to find an alternative solution have failed, a loan will be considered in default. Because of the intricacies involved in foreclosures and liquidation proceedings and because of the legal consequences involved, the NETEDD RLF Loan-Committee may choose to retain an attorney who specializes in this field to handle this process.

The following procedures will also be followed:
• A meeting will be held with the borrower to explain the liquidation procedures.
• Following the meeting, a letter of intent will be sent to the customer and all creditors that there is a delinquency, balance of the loan, interest accrued, etc.
• During the twenty-day waiting period, the NETEDD-RLF will make arrangements to either move the collateral or arrange for a public foreclosure on-premises. Lien searches will also be initiated to confirm NETEDD-RLF’s lien position. If necessary, an appraisal would be requested at this time. Taxing authorities would be contacted to determine the amount of taxes due if any.
• It should be noted that the NETEDD-RLF will try to reach a solution short of liquidation if at all possible. While the NETEDD-RLF must protect the capital in the Fund, it also does not wish to initiate proceedings which may result in the loss of jobs to the community. To the extent that a loan may be restructured or an acceptable alternative arrangement may be reached between the borrower and the NETEDD-RLF, liquidation will be considered a last
alternative.

Where applicable, the following documents will be included with each loan file:
1. All loan documents
2. Evidence of equity injection
3. Articles of incorporation
4. Bylaws
5. Charter
6. Corporate resolution authorizing the execution of loan documents
7. Certificate of good standing
8. Lease agreement
9. Landlord’s lien waiver
10. The legal description of the property
11. Application Package:

a. Loan application Page 16 of 178
b. Business Plan
c. Personal Financial Statement
d. Previous three years’ business financial statements
e. Environmental assessment
f. Lender commitment letter

12. UCC lien searches
13. UCC filings
14. Disclosure agreements
15. Lender subordination agreement
16. Minutes of NETEDD-RLF board action
17. Life insurance policy
18. Liability insurance policy
19. Fire insurance policy
20. Employment base certification
21. Copy of letter to applicant summarizing terms and conditions
22. Staff Report
23. Invoices for equipment purchased with loan proceeds

Administrative Procedures
The NETEDD RLF was established in 1989; therefore, it is not considered a NEW RLF. Accounts (maintained in a separate bank account for the EDA RLF portfolio) are established within the accounting system in order to clearly identify and audit repayments and interest income from the RLF funds. Monthly general ledgers are prepared for account status. The accounting system allows easy preparation of the reports as required by the EDA. Standard accounting procedures are used to maintain the accounts. The NETEDD-RLF is audited annually to ensure
compliance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and EDA requirements per 13 CFR 301.15(a).

Administrative Costs within acceptable EDA percentages are incurred by staff working to initiate, review and service RLF loans as well as to provide required reporting to the EDA per 13 CFR 307.12. In addition, legal fees may be reimbursed for RLF related services performed. Charges associated with RLF admin costs are reflected on-time tracking forms. Actions in compliance with 13 CFR 307.13(b).

Allowable Cash Percentage
NETEDD RLF utilizes finance staff to review the portfolio to ensure compliance with allowable
cash percentage standards per 13 CFR 301.17(b).

EDA Reporting
The RLF Plan acknowledges that EDA requires regular reporting based on the scoring of recipient data either annually or semi-annually. Recipient certifies as a part of the report that the RLF is operating in accordance with the RLF Plan and that the information provided is complete and accurate in compliance with 13 CFR 307.14.

Page 17 of 178
Audits
The RLF Plan acknowledges that EDA RLF funds are subject to an annual audit requirement and the full value of the RLF must be shown every year on the Recipient’s Schedule of Federal Expenditures. If the dollar amount of the RLF qualifies the RLF as a major Federal program, the recipient must ensure that the auditor performs the required Federal audit procedures. See 13 CFR 307.12(b)(3) and RLF Standard Terms and Conditions Part I.F.

(iii) Conflict of Interest
1. NETEDD shall not make loan or grant funds available to a business entity if the owner of such entity is related by blood, marriage, law or business arrangement to any officer or the employee of NETEDD or any member of the NETEDD Board of Director’s, or a member of any other committee, which advises, approves, recommends or otherwise participates in decisions concerning loans or the use of grant funds hereinafter referred to as “Other-Committee.”
2. No officer, employee, or member of the NETEDD Board of Directors or ‘Other-Committee,’ or a person related to the officer, employee, or member of the Board by blood, marriage, law or business arrangement shall receive any benefits resulting from the use of loan or grant funds, unless the officer, employee, or Board member affected first
discloses to NETEDD on the public record the proposed or potential benefit and receives NETEDD’s written determination that the benefit involved is not so substantial as to affect the integrity of NETEDD’s decision process and of the services of the officer, employee or board member.
3. An officer, employee, committee member or board member of NETEDD shall not solicit or accept, directly or indirectly, any gift, gratuity, favor, entertainment or any other thing of monetary value, for themselves or for another person, from any person or organization seeking to obtain a loan or any portion of the grant funds, Former board members, committee members and/or officers are ineligible to apply for or receive loan or grant funds for a period of two years from the date of termination of his/her services.

This certification agreement is to be executed by all board members upon their joining the board
and prior to their first meeting.
Page 18 of 178
Page 19 of 178
Page 20 of 178
Page 21 of 178
Page 22 of 178
Page 23 of 178
Page 24 of 178
Page 25 of 178
Page 26 of 178
Page 27 of 178
Page 28 of 178
Page 29 of 178
Page 30 of 178
Page 31 of 178
Page 32 of 178
Page 33 of 178
Page 34 of 178
Page 35 of 178
Page 36 of 178
Page 37 of 178
Page 38 of 178
Page 39 of 178
Page 40 of 178
Page 41 of 178
Page 42 of 178
Page 43 of 178
Page 44 of 178
Page 45 of 178
Page 46 of 178
Page 47 of 178
Page 48 of 178
Page 49 of 178
Page 50 of 178
Page 51 of 178
Page 52 of 178
Page 53 of 178
Page 54 of 178
Page 55 of 178
Page 56 of 178

2019 THREAT AND HAZARD
IDENTIFICATION AND RISK ASSESSMENT (THIRA)

Ark-Tex Council of Governments (ATCOG)
Page 57 of 178

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
Table of Contents
THIRA Overview…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
Threat/Hazards Context and Impacts ………………………………………………………………………… 6
Capability Targets…………………………………………………………………………………………………..13
Planning ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………13
Public Information and Warning…………………………………………………………………………….14
Operational Coordination……………………………………………………………………………………..15
Forensics and Attribution……………………………………………………………………………………..16
Intelligence and Information Sharing ……………………………………………………………………..17
Interdiction and Disruption……………………………………………………………………………………18
Screening, Search, and Detection …………………………………………………………………………19
Access Control and Identity Verification …………………………………………………………………20
Cybersecurity …………………………………………………………………………………………………….21
Physical Protective Measures……………………………………………………………………………….22
Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activities …………………………………………23
Supply Chain Integrity and Security……………………………………………………………………….24
Community Resilience…………………………………………………………………………………………25
Long-term Vulnerability Reduction…………………………………………………………………………26
Risk and Disaster Resilience Assessment………………………………………………………………27
Threats and Hazards Identification ………………………………………………………………………..28
Critical Transportation …………………………………………………………………………………………29
Environmental Response/Health and Safety …………………………………………………………..30
Fatality Management Services ……………………………………………………………………………..31
Fire Management and Suppression……………………………………………………………………….32
Logistics and Supply Chain Management……………………………………………………………….33
Mass Care Services ……………………………………………………………………………………………34
Mass Search and Rescue Operations ……………………………………………………………………35
On-scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement………………………………………………36
Operational Communications ……………………………………………………………………………….37
Public Health, Healthcare, and Emergency Medical Services…………………………………….38
Situational Assessment ……………………………………………………………………………………….39
Infrastructure Systems…………………………………………………………………………………………40
Page 58 of 178
Economic Recovery ……………………………………………………………………………………………41
Health and Social Services…………………………………………………………………………………..42
Housing…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….43
Natural and Cultural Resources…………………………………………………………………………….44

Page 59 of 178
THIRA Overview
The THIRA is a three-step risk assessment that helps answer the following questions:
• What threats and hazards can affect our community?
• If they occurred, what impacts would those threats and hazards have on our community?
• Based on those impacts, what capabilities should our community have?

The THIRA helps communities understand their risks and determine the level of capability they need in order to address those risks. The outputs from this process lay the foundation for determining a community’s capability gaps during the SPR process.

The THIRA follows a three-step process, as described in the Comprehensive Preparedness Guide
201, Third Edition:
1. Identify Threats and Hazards. Based on a combination of experience, forecasting, subject matter expertise, and other available resources, develop a list of threats and hazards that could affect the community. When deciding what threats or hazards to include in the THIRA, communities consider only those that challenge the community’s
ability to deliver at least one core capability more than any other incident; the THIRA is not intended to include less challenging threats and hazards.
2. Give Threats and Hazards Context. Describe the threats and hazards identified in Step 1, showing how they may affect the community and create challenges in performing the core capabilities. Identify the impacts a threat or hazard may have on a community.
3. Establish Capability Targets. Using the impacts described in Step 2, determine the level of capability that the community plans to achieve over time in order to manage the threats and hazards it faces. Using standardized language, create capability targets for each of the core capabilities based on this desired level of capability by identifying impacts, objectives, and time frame metrics. A core capability is comprised of several functional areas in which a community may have a gap. Each required standardized target addresses one or more functional areas.

Report Overview
This report contains two sections:
• THIRA Steps 1 and 2: Threats /Hazards Context and Impacts
o Identified threats and hazards Page 60 of 178
o Scenario descriptions
o Standardized impacts

• THIRA Step 3: Capability Targets
o Standardized capability targets Page 61 of 178
Threat/Hazard Descriptions and Impacts
Category Threat/Hazard Scenario Name Terrorism?
Natural Tornado No
Scenario Description

An F-3 tornado strikes the Richmond Ranch shopping district in Texarkana, Texas, 9:00 am, on the day
after Thanksgiving, which is when a massive amount of “Black Friday” shopping takes place. The storm
and tornado result in six inches of precipitation within one hour and winds to the NW of 30 mph. The tornado
impacts ten square miles in the Texarkana area, affecting 55,000 residents, and 10,000 visitors and
transients. The swath of the tornado runs diagonally across Richmond Ranch shopping district beginning
on I-30, traveling over Richmond Road toward University Drive.

Standardized Impact Estimates (You have the option to include additional impacts, as needed)
Impact Category Estimate Impact Category Estimate
Fatalities 20
Partner Organizations Involved In Incident Management 20

People Requiring Medical Care 500 Customers (Without Power Service) 15,000
People Requiring Rescue 6,500 Customers (Without Water Service) 0
People Requiring Evacuation 10,000 Customers (Without Communication) 25,000
Exposed Individuals (Hazmat-Related Incidents) N/A Structure Fires 4
People With Access And Functional Needs (AFN)
Affected 2,000 Miles Of Road Affected 25
People With Limited English Proficiency Affected 2,700
Affected Healthcare Facilities And
Social Service Organizations 3
People Requiring Food and Water 16,000
Damaged Natural And Cultural
Resources And Historic Properties 4
People Requiring Long-Term Housing 1,000 Businesses Closed Due To The Incident 1,750
People Requiring Shelter 4,000
Animals Requiring Shelter, Food, And Water 2,400
Jurisdictions Affected 4
Page 62 of 178
Sources Used to Develop Context Description and Calculate Impacts (Optional)
Discussions with law enforcement, fire, and emergency management SMEs
Datacensus.gov
American FactFinder
Wikipedia
National Park Service National Register of Historic Properties
Railroad Commission of Texas Public GIS Viewer
American Veterinary Medical Association Pet Ownership Calculator
Tex Americas Center Community Profile
Texas Department of Transportation
Google Maps
Case studies from other Tornados

Page 63 of 178
Category Threat/Hazard Scenario Name Terrorism?
Technological Hazmat Release-Chemical No
Scenario Description
A railcar carrying chlorine derails at the intersection of East 3rd street and the railroad in Mt. Pleasant,
Texas on a Sunday morning at 3:00 am in March resulting in a chemical spill of 40,000 gallons of liquid
chlorine. Wind speed is 15 mph moving SSW with 10% humidity resulting in the evacuation of everything five
square miles south of the incident, which is practically the southern half of the city with a mix of residential and industrial population affecting a total population of 16,000.

Standardized Impact Estimates (You have the option to include additional impacts, as needed)
Impact Category Estimate Impact Category Estimate
Fatalities 0
Partner Organizations Involved In
Incident Management 10
People Requiring Medical Care 1000 Customers (Without Power Service) N/A
People Requiring Rescue 0 Customers (Without Water Service) N/A
People Requiring Evacuation 2000 Customers (Without Communication) N/A
Exposed Individuals (Hazmat-Related Incidents) 1600 Structure Fires N/A
People With Access And Functional Needs (AFN)
Affected 1500 Miles Of Road Affected 3
People With Limited English Proficiency Affected 7,000
Affected Healthcare Facilities And
Social Service Organizations 1
People Requiring Food and Water 1000
Damaged Natural And Cultural
Resources And Historic Properties N/A
People Requiring Long-Term Housing N/A
Businesses Closed Due To The
Incident 12
People Requiring Shelter 1,000
Animals Requiring Shelter, Food, And
Water N/A
Jurisdictions Affected 2

Page 64 of 178
Sources Used to Develop Context Description and Calculate Impacts (Optional)
Discussions with law enforcement, fire, and emergency management SMEs
Emergency Response Guidebook 2016
Datacensus.gov
American FactFinder
Wikipedia
Railroad Commission of Texas Public GIS Viewer
Google Maps
National Park Service National Register of Historic Properties
Page 65 of 178
Category Threat/Hazard Scenario Name Terrorism?
Human-Caused Active Shooter Yes

Scenario Description
An active shooter is located at Paris Junior College in Paris, Texas, at 10:00 am the first week in May
while thousands of students are taking their final exams. Moments before the shooting begins, an
anonymous bomb threat involving multiple bombs on campus is made. The combination of events affects
the total population of 6,000 people.

Standardized Impact Estimates (You have the option to include additional impacts, as needed)
Impact Category Estimate Impact Category Estimate
Fatalities 10
Partner Organizations Involved In
Incident Management 12
People Requiring Medical Care 600 Customers (Without Power Service) N/A
People Requiring Rescue 1200 Customers (Without Water Service) N/A
People Requiring Evacuation 6000 Customers (Without Communication) N/A
Exposed Individuals (Hazmat-Related Incidents) N/A Structure Fires N/A
People With Access And Functional Needs (AFN)
Affected 150 Miles Of Road Affected N/A
People With Limited English Proficiency Affected 100
Affected Healthcare Facilities And
Social Service Organizations 4
People Requiring Food and Water N/A
Damaged Natural And Cultural
Resources And Historic Properties N/A
People Requiring Long-Term Housing N/A
Businesses Closed Due To The
Incident 5
People Requiring Shelter N/A
Animals Requiring Shelter, Food, And
Water N/A
Jurisdictions Affected 4
Sources Used to Develop Context Description and Calculate Impacts (Optional)
Discussions with law enforcement, fire, and emergency management SMEs
Datacensus.gov
American FactFinder
Case studies from other Active Shooter attacks

Page 66 of 178
Category Threat/Hazard Scenario Name Terrorism?
Human-Caused Explosive Devices Yes
Scenario Description
After dismantling the backup control valves, a terrorist strikes an un-monitored section of the 42″ natural
gas pipeline with 1400 pounds of pressure exposed near the compression station located at 1034 County
Road 4223, Atlanta, Texas, at 10:00 pm on July 12, resulting in 400,000 cubic feet of compressed natural
gas being released. The terrorist then sets it on fire, which causes an explosion and a continual burning
fire that reaches temperatures of 1500 degrees. The wind speed is 10 mph moving east with 60%
humidity. Pipeline company response time is at a minimum of 30 minutes.

Standardized Impact Estimates (You have the option to include additional impacts, as needed)
Impact Category Estimate Impact Category Estimate
Fatalities 1
Partner Organizations Involved In
Incident Management 10
People Requiring Medical Care 5 Customers (Without Power Service) N/A
People Requiring Rescue 15 Customers (Without Water Service) N/A
People Requiring Evacuation 100 Customers (Without Communication) N/A
Exposed Individuals (Hazmat-Related Incidents) 15 Structure Fires 3
People With Access And Functional Needs (AFN)
Affected 11 Miles Of Road Affected 2
People With Limited English Proficiency Affected 4
Affected Healthcare Facilities And
Social Service Organizations 1
People Requiring Food and Water
N/A Damaged Natural And Cultural
Resources And Historic Properties 0
People Requiring Long-Term Housing
N/A Businesses Closed Due To The
Incident 1
People Requiring Shelter N/A
Animals Requiring Shelter, Food, And
Water N/A
Jurisdictions Affected 2

Page 67 of 178
Sources Used to Develop Context Description and Calculate Impacts (Optional)
Discussions with law enforcement, fire, and emergency management SMEs Coordinators
Railroad Commission of Texas Public GIS Viewer
Pipeline Awareness.org
Subject Matter Experts – Emergency Management Coordinators
Railroad Commission of Texas Public GIS Viewer
Datacensus.gov
American FactFinder

Page 68 of 178
Capability Targets
Planning
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within every 5 years update all emergency operations plans that define the roles and responsibilities of 75 partner organizations involved in incident management across 38 jurisdictions affected, and the sequence and scope of tasks needed to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond to, and recover from events.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
In our region, emergency operation plans are being updated on a 5-year cycle. Our region includes 38 jurisdictions, with 50 partner organizations typically involved in disaster planning and response.

Partner agencies include the red cross, public works, 211, NETRAC, NETPC, VOADS, COADS, County/City/State Law Enforcement Agencies, public health facilities, public works, and private sector, partners.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 69 of 178
Public Information and Warning
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1-hour notice of an incident, deliver reliable and actionable information to 65,000 people affected, including 150 people with access and functional needs (affected) and 5,000 people with limited English proficiency affected.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability targets deprived of a worst-case scenario in which a tornado hits the City of Texarkana, affecting 55,000 residents and 10,000 transients. Limited English proficiency data was formed by calculating the City of Texarkana’s non-English speaking population. In most jurisdictions, public warning sirens are tested on a weekly basis. In the jurisdictions that lack warning sirens, capabilities are tested on a weekly basis through social media. Reports are
generated to determine how many individuals viewed the social media post.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 70 of 178
Operational Coordination
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of a potential or actual incident, establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process across 3 jurisdictions affected and with 6 partner organizations involved in incident management. Maintain for 14 day(s).

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target is derived from worst-case scenarios and real-world events. In a worst-case scenario, a unified and coordinated operational structure would process across an average of 3 jurisdictions. This capability target has been tested during the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October of 2019, and the City of Atlanta fires in October
2019. The Hopkins County pipeline incident included 6 partner organizations and incident management was maintained for 13 days.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 71 of 178
Forensics and Attribution
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of a suspected terrorist attack, conduct outreach to the fusion center and Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) in the community and identify 1 personnel assigned to support follow up information sharing, intelligence analysis, and/or investigative actions associated with the collection, examination, and analysis of evidence, as well as the identification of perpetrators.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target was developed by surveying law enforcement and emergency management Subject Matter Experts in our region. It has been determined that 1 personnel is typically assigned to support follow up information sharing. Outreach to the fusion center and Joint Terrorism Task Force happens within the first hour of a suspected terrorist attack.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Explosive Devices

Page 72 of 178
Intelligence and Information Sharing
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours of the identification or notification of a credible threat, identify/analyze the local context of the threat for the respective area of responsibility, and facilitate the sharing of threat information with 5 priority intelligence stakeholder agencies/entities in accordance with the intelligence cycle, and all dissemination protocols.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target is derived from real-world events and intel of emergency management Subject Matter Experts. This capability has been tested during the City of Atlanta fires and arson investigation of October 2019. Within the first hour of the incident, information was shared among 5 priority intelligence stakeholder agencies; including agencies outside of the jurisdiction in which the incident occurred.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Active Shooter

Page 73 of 178
Interdiction and Disruption
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of the identification or notification of a credible threat, conduct outreach to the fusion center and Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) in the community and identify 1 personnel assigned to support follow up interdiction and disruption activities that may be undertaken against identified suspects and/or contraband.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability target was developed by surveying law enforcement and emergency management SME’s in our region. It has been determined that 1 personnel is typically assigned to support follow up interdiction and disruption activities. Outreach to the fusion center and Joint Terrorism Task Force should occur within the first hour of a credible threat.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Explosive Devices

Page 74 of 178
Screening, Search, and Detection
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 3 hours of notice of a credible threat, conduct screening, search, and detection operations for 1500 people requiring screening, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring screening).

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:

The capability target was derived from surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts. Due to a lack of equipment and personnel, many of our smaller jurisdictions would have difficulties achieving this capability target on a local level. With mutual aid on a regional level, this capability target can be achieved in the next 3-5 years.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Explosive Devices

Page 75 of 178
Access Control and Identity Verification
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours of an event, be prepared to accept credentials from 20 partner organizations involved in incident management.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target was derived from surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts and was evaluated on a smaller scale during the Hopkins County pipeline an incident in October 2019.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Active shooter

Page 76 of 178
Cybersecurity
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1-year appropriate authorities review and update cyber incident plans/annexes based on evolving threats covering 75 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target was derived from current plans and capabilities. As a whole, our region has 38 municipalities with an average of 2 critical infrastructure facilities being publicly managed and regulated. After surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts, it has been determined that most jurisdictions review and update their cybersecurity policies on an annual basis. Also, it is now a requirement for HSGD grantees to complete the National Cyber Security Review on an annual basis.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Active Shooter

Page 77 of 178
Physical Protective Measures
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 6 months of completing a risk and vulnerability assessment, appropriate authorities review and update physical security plans covering 3 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities to incorporate new information from the assessment.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target is derived from real-world events and current plans and capabilities. Currently, most jurisdictions are completing risk and vulnerability assessments at all publicly managed critical infrastructure facilities on an annual basis. After surveying subject matter experts, it has been determined that a minimum time of 6 months would be needed to have appropriate authorities review and update the physical security plan. This time frame includes the time to conduct multiple meetings to discuss and review the current plans and potential changes, as well as the time to get official approval.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Active Shooter

Page 78 of 178
Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1-year appropriate authorities conduct a review of relevant physical and cyber threats and hazards, vulnerabilities, and strategies for risk management covering 75 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target was derived from current plans and capabilities. As a whole, our
region has 38 municipalities with an average of 2 critical infrastructure facilities being
publicly managed and regulated. After surveying subject matter experts, it has been
determined that most jurisdictions review and update their cybersecurity policies on
an annual basis. Also, it is now a requirement for HSGD grantees to complete the National Cyber Security Review on an annual basis.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Active Shooter

Page 79 of 178
Supply Chain Integrity and Security
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1 year engage 75 partner organizations involved in incident management to promote awareness of threats, dependencies, vulnerabilities, and strategies to support the restoration of private sector supply chains.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target is derived from current capabilities and real-world events. Our regional goal for the next 3-5 years to engage 75 partner organizations on an annual basis. Currently, we are working with our LEPC’s, RAC, and COADS to achieve this target. All three organizations are currently meeting on a quarterly basis. We will continue to encourage more participation with these groups to achieve our regional goal of 75 partner organizations.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Hazmat

Page 80 of 178
Community Resilience
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every [1 year], conduct [7] outreach events or activities to increase awareness of locally significant threats and hazards to help the residents be more prepared to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from those events.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target is derived from current plans and real-world events. Currently, our jurisdictions are conducting numerous outreach events on an annual basis. Some community outreach events and activities include National Night Out, Fire Prevention Week, Skywarn Classes, Health Fairs, and Neighborhood Watch. Jurisdictions are
also setting up at local events and distributing Pub Ed material when available.

Hopkins County is also utilizing Social Media and Radio to broadcast a monthly preparedness update to the community. In the next 3-5 years, our goal is to have every county conduct a minimum of 7 outreach events or activities annually to help the residents be more prepared to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and
recover from events.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 81 of 178
Long-term Vulnerability Reduction
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every [1 year], [38] jurisdiction review their building codes, and, if necessary, enact or update risk-appropriate, disaster-resilient building codes.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability is derived from current capabilities and real-world events. Currently, most of our 38 jurisdictions are reviewing building codes and performing risk assessments on an annual basis. Our goal is to sustain this capability.
Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 82 of 178
Risk and Disaster Resilience Assessment
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1 year after identifying threats and hazards of concern, model the impacts of 4 threat and hazard scenarios to incorporate into planning efforts.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Currently, we are developing our region Threat and Hazard Identification Risk Assessment on an annual basis. Our current THIRA models the impacts of 4 threat and hazard scenarios and are incorporated into regional planning efforts.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Tornado

Page 83 of 178
Threats and Hazards Identification
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1 year engage with 38 jurisdictions and 25 partner organizations involved in incident management to assess the threats and hazards that are realistic and would significantly impact your communities.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Currently, we are developing our region Threat and Hazard Identification Risk Assessment on an annual basis. We plan to utilize THIRA surveys to engage all 38 municipalities to assess the threats and hazards. In the next 3-5 years, our goal is to have 25 partner organization participate in the development of the Threat and Hazard
Identification Risk Assessment.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Tornado

Page 84 of 178
Critical Transportation
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours’ notice of an impending incident, complete the evacuation of 2000 people requiring evacuation, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring evacuation).

Within 2 hours of an incident, clear 1 miles of road affected, to enable access for emergency responders, including private and non-profit.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
After surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts, we have determined that the evacuation of 2,000 people including 75 people with access and functional needs could occur within 2 hours. This capability target can be achieved by utilizing school and public transportation buses. The evacuation of individuals with access and
functional needs can be achieved by using local healthcare facility vans. Most of the local healthcare facility vans are designed to accommodate people with access and functional needs.

This Capability Target was also derived from a real-world incident, The Franklin County Tornado. During this incident, the crew was only able to clear roughly ½ miles of road within 4 hours. Due to Franklin County being one of our smallest jurisdictions, SME’s have determined that we could reasonable clear 1 mile of road per hour with
the right resources. This Capability target includes the time it takes for resources to arrive as well as the 1 mile per hour of road clearing.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 85 of 178
Environmental Response/Health and Safety
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours of an incident, assess, contain, and begin cleaning up hazardous material releases from 1 hazmat release site. Within 6 hours of a hazmat incident, complete decontamination procedures for 25 exposed
individuals (hazmat-related incidents).

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target is derived from real-world events, current plans, and exercises. After surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts, it has been determined that deployment and set up for a hazmat incident would take roughly 2 hours. With limit resources and only 1 regional hazmat team, it has been determined that our
region is capable of handling only one hazmat release site.

Our goal for the next 3-5 years is to complete decontamination procedures of 25 exposed individuals within the first 6 hours of a hazmat incident. This Capability target has been tested during the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October 2019, as well as in the Red River Army Depot Exercise in September 2019.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Hazmat

Page 86 of 178
Fatality Management Services
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 24 hours of an incident, complete the recovery, identification, and mortuary services, including temporary storage services, for 20 fatalities.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target was derived from surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts and evaluating available resources in our region. We currently have search and rescue teams, and a regional dive team to conduct body recovery activates. In our region, we also have a mortuary trailer that can temporally store up to 16 bodies.
Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 87 of 178
Fire Management and Suppression
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of an incident, conduct firefighting operations to suppress and extinguish 5 structure fires.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target was derived from surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts. It has been determined that firefighting operations would be conducted within the 1 hour of an incident and that each county could potentially handle 5 structural fires dependent on intensity. This Capability target has been tested through daily operations, as well as during the City of Atlanta arson fires in October 2019.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 88 of 178
Logistics and Supply Chain Management
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 12 hours of an incident, identify and mobilize life-sustaining commodities, resources, and services to 1,500 people requiring shelter and 1,500 people requiring food and water.

Maintain a distribution system for 14 days.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target was established by surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts and real-world Incidents. During the Hopkins County pipeline incident, life-sustaining commodities and resources were identified and mobilized within the first 12 hours. This distribution system was maintained for a total of 13 days. Although the
Hopkins County pipeline incident was of a smaller scale, our goal for the next 3-5 years is to be able to provide these resources and services to a minimum of 1,500 people requiring shelter, food, and water.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 89 of 178
Mass Care Services
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 24 hours of an incident, provide emergency shelter, food, and water for 1,500 people requiring shelter and 1,500 people requiring food and water, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible shelter) and 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring food and water), and 200 animals requiring shelter, food, and water. Maintain for 7 days.

Within 7 days of an incident, move 300 people requiring temporary, non-congregate housing, including 25 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible, temporary, non-congregate housing), from congregate care to temporary housing.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target was derived from emergency management Subject Matter Experts and current plans and capabilities. Several organizations across the region have withdrawn from shelter agreements. Currently, the Red Cross is handling most jurisdictions shelter plans and has established that they can only shelter for a maximum of 7 days due to limited personnel and resources.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Tornado

Page 90 of 178
Mass Search and Rescue Operations
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of an incident, conduct search and rescue operations for 1,500 people requiring
rescue.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target was established by surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts. In the next 3-5 years, our goal is to conduct search and rescue operations for 1,500 people. To achieve this goal, we will need to obtain more resources such as thermal imaging Googles, Cadaver dogs, and training for our search and rescue teams.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Tornado

Page 91 of 178
On-scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours of an incident, provide security and law enforcement services to protect emergency responders and 5,000 people affected.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target was derived from current capabilities and real-world incidents. This capability is exercised regularly when hosting special events in the region. These special events can sometimes attract more than 5,000 attendees. After surveying subject matter experts, our goal for the next 3-5 years is to provide security and law
enforcement services within 2 hours of an incident to emergency responders and 5,000 people affected.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 92 of 178
Operational Communications
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of an incident, establish interoperable communications across 38 jurisdictions affected and with 50 partner organizations involved in incident management. Maintain for 14 days.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability Target is derived from current capabilities, exercises, and real-world events. Interoperable communication across our 38 jurisdictions can be established within the first hour of an incident through the ATCOG repeater channel. ATCOG repeater channel is tested on a monthly basis across all Emergency Operation Centers in our region. This capability has been tested and maintained for 13 days during the Hopkins County
pipeline incident in October 2019.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 93 of 178
Public Health, Healthcare, and Emergency Medical Services
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 4 hours of an incident, complete triage, begin definitive medical treatment and transfer to an appropriate facility 200 people requiring medical care.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target was derived from surveying our Hospital Preparedness Coordinator, and DSHS representatives. This capability has also been tested on a smaller scale during the City of Texarkana Airport Exercise. A large portion of the ATCOG region is comprised of rural communities, therefore there is a lack of medical staff to complete triage and medical transport. Our goal for the next 3-5 years is to triage, treat, and transfer 150 people requiring medical care within the first 4 hours of an incident.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Active Shooter

Page 94 of 178
Situational Assessment
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of the incident, and on a 1-hour cycle thereafter, provide notification to leadership and 20 partner organizations involved in incident management of the current and projected situation. Maintain for 7 days.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability target is derived from current capabilities and real-world incidents and is a test in daily operations. This capability was tested during the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October 2019, the City of Atlanta fires in October 2019, and Red River Army Depot full-scale exercise in September 2019.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Tornado

Page 95 of 178
Infrastructure Systems
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 2,000 customers without water service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 2,000 customers without wastewater service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 25,000 customers without communication service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 9,000 customers without electricity service.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability
Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target was derived from surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts, and worst-case scenarios. Regardless of incident type, our goal for the next 3-5 years is to efficiently restore life-sustaining systems and services to the affected community within 72 hours of the incident.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 96 of 178
Economic Recovery
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 month of an incident, reopen 75 businesses closed due to the incident.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability is derived from surveying subject matter experts, and current capabilities. Our goal for the next 3-5 years is to open 75 closed businesses within the first month of the incident. To achieve this goal, jurisdictions will need to continue doing regular building inspections, and working with private sectors to develop Continuity of Operation Plans.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve this capability target?
Tornado

Page 97 of 178
Health and Social Services
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 week of an incident, restore functions at 5 affected healthcare facilities and social service organizations.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
The capability target was derived from surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts, and the regional hospital preparedness coordinator. Our goal for the next 3-5 years is to restore functions and services at primary healthcare and social services organizations within 1 week of an incident. These facilities include hospitals, health
clinics, social security offices, and departments of health and human services.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Tornado

Page 98 of 178
Housing
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 year of an incident, 1,000 people requiring long-term housing, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible long-term housing), find and secure long-term housing.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability is derived from surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts and reviewing other areas’ disaster housing capacities. Currently, jurisdictions in our region are developing long-term housing plans. Programs such as HUD housing can take up to two years to house clients. Our goal for the next 3-5 years is to update housing plans and build relationships with commercial housing agencies. This will allow us to build the capabilities needed to house 1,500 people and 75 people with access and functional needs within 1 year of an incident.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Tornado

Page 99 of 178
Natural and Cultural Resources
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 3 months of an incident, restore 5 damaged natural and cultural resources and historic properties registered in the jurisdiction.

Capability Target Context
Provide a brief paragraph explaining the logic behind the numbers used in the Capability Target. Numbers could be derived from:
Capability is derived from surveying emergency management Subject Matter Experts and real-world incidents. In October 2019 Hopkins pipeline incident affected the historic Turkey Creek properties.

Which of your identified threats and hazards most challenges the region’s ability to achieve
this capability target?
Tornado

Page 100 of 178
2019 STAKEHOLDER
PREPAREDNESS REVIEW (SPR)
[Ark-Tex Council of Governments] Page 101 of 178
FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
Table of Contents
SPR Overview ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
SPR Capability Assessment …………………………………………………………………………………….. 5
Planning ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5
Public Information and Warning…………………………………………………………………………….. 7
Operational Coordination……………………………………………………………………………………… 9
Forensics and Attribution……………………………………………………………………………………..11
Intelligence and Information Sharing ……………………………………………………………………..13
Interdiction and Disruption……………………………………………………………………………………15
Screening, Search, and Detection …………………………………………………………………………17
Access Control and Identity Verification …………………………………………………………………19
Cybersecurity …………………………………………………………………………………………………….21
Physical Protective Measures……………………………………………………………………………….23
Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activities …………………………………………25
Supply Chain Integrity and Security……………………………………………………………………….27
Community Resilience…………………………………………………………………………………………28
Long-term Vulnerability Reduction…………………………………………………………………………30
Risk and Disaster Resilience Assessment………………………………………………………………32
Threats and Hazards Identification ………………………………………………………………………..33
Critical Transportation …………………………………………………………………………………………34
Environmental Response/Health and Safety …………………………………………………………..36
Fatality Management Services ……………………………………………………………………………..38
Fire Management and Suppression……………………………………………………………………….40
Logistics and Supply Chain Management……………………………………………………………….42
Mass Care Services ……………………………………………………………………………………………44
Mass Search and Rescue Operations ……………………………………………………………………46
On-scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement………………………………………………48
Operational Communications ……………………………………………………………………………….49
Public Health, Healthcare, and Emergency Medical Services…………………………………….51
Situational Assessment ……………………………………………………………………………………….52
Infrastructure Systems…………………………………………………………………………………………53
Economic Recovery ……………………………………………………………………………………………55
Page 102 of 178
Health and Social Services…………………………………………………………………………………..56
Housing…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….57
Natural and Cultural Resources…………………………………………………………………………….59
2020 Priorities………………………………………………………………………………………………………..61

Page 103 of 178
SPR Overview

The SPR is an annual self-assessment of a community’s capability levels based on the capability targets identified in the THIRA. It helps answer the questions:
• What are our current capability levels and how have our capabilities changed over the last year?
• What gaps exist between the capabilities we want to achieve and the capabilities we currently, have?
The SPR follows a two-step process:
1. Assess Capabilities. Based on the language from the capability targets set in the THIRA, identify the community’s current capability and describe any significant capability changes over the last year.
2. Describe Capability Gaps: Determine the causes of the capability gap between the capability target and the current capability identified in SPR Step 1, addressing each of the POETE elements (Planning, Organization, Equipment, Training, and Exercises).

Page 104 of 178
SPR Capability Assessment
Planning
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within every 5 years update all emergency operations plans that define the roles and responsibilities of 75 partner organizations involved in incident management across 38 jurisdictions affected, and the sequence and scope of tasks needed to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond to, and recover from events.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within every 5 years update all emergency operations plans that define the roles and responsibilities of 50 partner organizations involved in incident management across 38 jurisdictions affected, and the sequence and scope of tasks needed to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond to, and recover from events.

Capability Change Description
To sustain the Planning capability, emergency operation plans are being updated on a 5-year cycle. We are continuing to engage more partner organizations that are involved in incident management by staying active with our RAC, COADS, and LEPC groups.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Development and enhancement of emergency management plans, Hazard Mitigation Plans, and COOP Plans.

Organization
Additional personnel is needed to support effective planning. Multiple counties have emergency managers that are tasked with other responsibilities that do not directly correlate to emergency management functions.

Equipment
N/A

Training

Page 105 of 178

Region needs training for developing Emergency Operation Plans. Incident Actions Plans and Recovery plans at the local level.
• AWR-156 Principles of Planning and Implementing Recovery
• E0103: Planning: Emergency Operations
• E0197: Integrating Access and Functional Needs into Emergency Planning
• Continuity of Operations Planning
• Local Volunteer and Donations Management
• MGT-383 Emergency Operations Plans for Rural Jurisdictions
• PER-294 Testing an Emergency Operations Plan in a Rural EOC

Exercises
Region needs to conduct planning workshops and COOP exercises.
Whole community involvement with exercises is needed.

Page 106 of 178
Public Information and Warning

SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1-hour notice of an incident, deliver reliable and actionable information to 65,000 people affected, including 150 people with access and functional needs (affected) and 5,000 people with limited English proficiency affected.

The estimate of Current Capability
Within 2-hours’ notice of an incident, deliver reliable and actionable information to 65,000 people affected, including 150 people with access and functional needs (affected) and 5,000 people with limited English proficiency affected.

Capability Change Description
As a region, we are currently building public information and warning capabilities. Most jurisdictions are testing weather sirens on a weekly basis, as well as IRIS and CodeRed on a monthly basis. Jurisdictions that do not have warning systems are testing capabilities through social media, television broadcast, and radio broadcast.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps

Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Develop plans to deliver reliable and actionable information to residents and emergency responders. Develop plans to deliver reliable and actionable information to people with access and functional needs, as well as limited English proficiency.

Organization
N/A

Equipment
Mass notification systems are needed in Delta County, Hopkins County, and Morris County. Warning sirens are needed in Hopkins County, Lamar County, Morris County, and Red River County.

Training
Page 107 of 178

More training is needed on CodeRed and IPAWS systems. Training is needed for the delivery of information to individuals with access and functional needs as well as individuals with limited English proficiency. Additional training needed includes:
• Advanced Public Information Officer Course
• Basic Public Information Officers Course
• E0105 Public Information and Warning
• Joint Information System/Center Planning for Tribal, State, and Local Public

Information Officers
• COOP Training
• Regional Emergency Notification System Administrator Training
• Regional Emergency Notification System Dispatcher Training
• Regional Emergency Notification System User Training
• Social Media Engagement Strategies
• Social Media for Natural Disaster Response and Recovery
• Social Media Tools and Techniques

Exercises
Past exercises show that staff couldn’t access the system when the key person responsible was not available. Backup personnel need to be trained on how to access and work the warning system during exercises and real-world demonstrations.

Page 108 of 178

Operational Coordination
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of a potential or actual incident, establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process across 3 jurisdictions affected and with 6 partner organizations involved in incident management. Maintain for 14 day(s).

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 1 hour of a potential or actual incident, establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process across 3 jurisdictions affected and with 6 partner organizations involved in incident management. Maintain for 14 day(s).

Capability Change Description
The region is conducting quarterly Emergency Management meetings for EMC’s to coordinate, plan, and engage with other EMC’s in the region. We are actively involved with our critical partner organizations, RAC, LEPCs, and COADs on a regular basis. This capability has been exercised during the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October of 2019, and the City of Atlanta fires in October 2019.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps

Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Enhance emergency operation plans and communication plans.
Incorporate COAD’s and LEPC’s in the planning process.

Organization
Personnel is needed for operations in EOC over multiple operational periods. Also, additional trained and qualified personnel throughout the region is needed to support the operation coordination gaps.

Equipment
Physical space with hygiene amenities is needed for EOC operations. EOC equipment is needed such
as:
• Computers/Laptops
• Communications
• Projectors
• Smart Boards

Page 109 of 178

Training
Little training has occurred due to budgetary restraints. Training that is needed includes:
• WebEOC training
• Advanced Incident Command System for Command and General Staff – Complex Incidents
• Emergency Operations Center Management and Operations
• Emergency Operations Center/Incident Command System Interface
• MGT-360 Incident Command: Capabilities, Planning, and Response Actions for All Hazards
• Partner Coordination in Disaster Response and Recovery Exercises

More multi-agency exercises are needed to address the operational coordination gaps.
Participation in regional communication exercises.

Page 110 of 178

Forensics and Attribution
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of a suspected terrorist attack, conduct outreach to the fusion center and Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) in the community and identify 1 personnel assigned to support follow up information sharing, intelligence analysis, and/or investigative actions associated with the collection, examination, and analysis of evidence, as well as the identification of perpetrators.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 2 hours of a suspected terrorist attack, conduct outreach to the fusion center and Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) in the community and identify 1 personnel assigned to support follow up information sharing, intelligence analysis, and/or investigative actions associated with the collection, examination, and analysis of evidence, as well as the identification of perpetrators.

Capability Change Description
Forensic and attribution capabilities are not exercised often. In order to build this capability, we will need law enforcement officers with SECRET clearance to facilitate intelligence sharing with state and federal partners in each county.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps

Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Develop forensic analysis processing plans.

Organization
Jurisdictions need forensic analysis and law enforcement officers with secret clearance to facilitate intelligence and information sharing.

Equipment
Jurisdictions need evidence collection equipment, PPE, and a budget for forensic analysis. Biometric systems, crime scene exploration and documentation tools, and forensic analysis systems are needed throughout the region. CBRNE material analysis equipment and evidence management systems need to be sustained and improved in order to support this capability.

Training
Page 111 of 178

Jurisdictions need training for crime scene control, communications and evidence collection.
Additional forensic training classes needed includes:
• AWR-103 Crime Scene Management for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, or Explosive Incidents
• AWR-305 Bioterrorism Awareness: Collaboration Among First Responders and Health Professionals Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program Training Course

• Mile2 Certified Network Forensics Examiner
• PER-201 Evidence Collection in a Hazardous Materials Environment
• PER-220 Emergency Response to Domestic Biological Incidents
• PER-222 Public Safety WMD Response – Sampling Techniques and Guidelines
• PER-228 Advanced Forensic Investigations for Hazardous Environments

Exercises
Additional exercises are needed to validate existing plans and policies within the region that pertain to this capability. Training/exercises for crime scene control, communications and evidence collection for officers would be are a need as well.

Page 112 of 178
Intelligence and Information Sharing
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours of the identification or notification of a credible threat, identify/analyze the local context of the threat for the respective area of responsibility, and facilitate the sharing of threat information with 5 priority intelligence stakeholder agencies/entities in accordance with the intelligence cycle, and all dissemination protocols.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 4 hours of the identification or notification of a credible threat, identify/analyze the local context of the threat for the respective area of responsibility, and facilitate the sharing of threat information with 5 priority intelligence stakeholder agencies/entities in accordance with the intelligence cycle, and all dissemination protocols.

Capability Change Description
Intelligence and Information Sharing capabilities have been exercised during the City of Atlanta fires and arson investigation in October 2019. Information was shared among 5 priority intelligence stakeholder agencies. The City of Texarkana provided mutual aid with the fires and investigation, and the suspect was apprehended.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps

Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Jurisdictions need to update Emergency Operation Plans and annexes. Terrorism response plans and mutual aid agreements should be established.

Organization
Each county will need at least one Law Enforcement Officer with SECRET clearance to facilitate information sharing.

Equipment
N/A

Training
Need training in managing sensitive information. The region needs universal training on operations of systems such as WebEOC, HSIN, and IPAWS. Additional classes needed includes:
• AWR-122 Law Enforcement Prevention and Deterrence of Terrorist Acts

Page 113 of 178
• AWR-160-W Terrorism Awareness for Emergency First Responders
• AWR-305 Bioterrorism Awareness: Collaboration Among First Responders and Health Professionals
• AWR-315 Criminal Intelligence Analysis Essentials

Exercises
Our region needs increased participation from non-governmental, private sector, and elected officials in exercises. Future exercises should include metrics, as applicable, to validate intelligence and information analysis practices. Exercises are needed to evaluate the relay of information when crossing over to other counties and jurisdictions.

Page 114 of 178
Interdiction and Disruption

SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of the identification or notification of a credible threat, conduct outreach to the fusion center and Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) in the community and identify 1 personnel assigned to support follow up interdiction and disruption activities that may be undertaken against identified suspects and/or contraband.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 2 hours of the identification or notification of a credible threat, conduct outreach to the fusion center and Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) in the community and identify 1 personnel assigned to support follow up interdiction and disruption activities that may be undertaken against identified suspects and/or contraband.

Capability Change Description
There are no significant changes to the interdiction and disruption capability level. Due to lack of personnel, smaller jurisdictions can only assign 1 personnel to follow up interdiction and disruption activities.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Plans need to be updated to include stakeholders and private sector partners. Mutual Aid Agreements should be established between jurisdictions.

Organization
Additional personnel is needed to support this capability; smaller jurisdictions don’t have the staff to monitor activities. Law Enforcement agencies need additional personnel to support anti-terrorism operations. More HAZMAT teams and technicians are needed as well.

Equipment
Law Enforcement agencies need night vision goggles, pole cameras, and ballistic body armor. Hazmat teams need CBRNE detections and collections tools, and PPE.

Training
Training is not held on this subject frequently due to a lack of personnel to implement. Hazmat teams in the region are in need of refresher training courses and other courses to better implement this capability. Training courses needed includes:

Page 115 of 178
• AWR-122 Law Enforcement Prevention and Deterrence of Terrorist Acts
• AWR-153 Principles of Detection and Diagnosis – Strategies and Technologies
• AWR-305 Bioterrorism Awareness: Collaboration Among First Responders and Health

Professionals
• PER-296 CBRNE Rural Response Threat Protocol
• PER-320 Personal Protective Measures for Biological Events
• PER-904 Radiological Emergency Response Operations
• PER-905 Advanced Radiological Emergency Response Operations

Exercises
This capability is not exercised often due to lack of personnel, additional exercises are needed within the region to validate existing plans.

Page 116 of 178
Screening, Search, and Detection
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 3 hours of notice of a credible threat, conduct screening, search, and detection operations for 1500 people requiring screening, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring screening).

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 3 hours of notice of a credible threat, conduct screening, search, and detection operations for 1000 people requiring screening, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring screening).

Capability Change Description
There are no significant changes to the Screening, Search, and Detection capability. This capability is not exercised often due to a lack of equipment and personnel. Many of the smaller jurisdictions would rely on mutual aid to assist with the screening, search, and detection of a large number of people.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Planning is done on a local basis with local policies. Stakeholders and private partners need to be included in the planning process to strengthen this capability.

Organization
More personnel needed for searching and screening bags and people. More law enforcement personnel is needed for physical investigation measures.

Equipment
Metal detectors and x-ray machines are needed in the region to support this capability.

Training
Need training on proper screening, search and detection protocols including electronic search and screening. Additional courses needed includes:
• AWR-122 Law Enforcement Prevention and Deterrence of Terrorist Acts
• AWR-153 Principles of Detection and Diagnosis – Strategies and Technologies
• MGT-335 Event Security Planning for Public Safety Professionals

Page 117 of 178

Exercises
Need increased incorporation into exercise objectives and scenarios; this capability is rarely included in exercises.

Page 118 of 178
Access Control and Identity Verification
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of an event, be prepared to accept credentials from 20 partner organizations involved in incident management.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 2 hours of an event, be prepared to accept credentials from 20 partner organizations involved in incident management.

Capability Change Description
There has been no significant change in the Access Control and Identity Verification capability level, however, it has been exercised during the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October 2019 on a smaller scale. Activities to increase technological and cyber access control measures includes annual cybersecurity assessments such as the National Cyber Security Review, which is now an HSGD grant requirement.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Planning efforts for controlling cyber and physical access, as well as verifying the identity of those accessing cyber and physical locations and resources is needed.

Organization
Small jurisdictions need additional trained personnel to support access control of critical infrastructure and identity verification of visitors to high-profile targets within the region.

Equipment
Identification card machines, card printing materials, personnel database solutions that validate certifications, and personnel photography equipment is needed throughout the region.

Training
Need training pertaining to controlling cyber access and identity verification.
• AWR-173-W Information Security Basics

Page 119 of 178
• AWR-187 Terrorism and WMD Awareness in the Workplace

Exercises
Need increased incorporation into exercise objectives and scenarios; capability is rarely included in exercises.

Page 120 of 178
Cybersecurity
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1-year appropriate authorities review and update cyber incident plans/annexes based on evolving threats covering 75 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities.

An estimate of Current Capability
Every 1-year appropriate authorities review and update cyber incident plans/annexes based on evolving threats covering 75 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities.

Capability Change Description
Cybersecurity capabilities levels have increased across the region and will continue. Most jurisdictions review and update their cybersecurity policies on an annual basis. Additionally, it is now a requirement for HSGD grantees to complete the National Cyber Security Review on an annual basis.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
N/A

Organization
Several jurisdictions are in need of in-house IT technicians.

Equipment
Some systems have firewalls and protective measures in place, but stronger systems/hardware is needed.

Training
Some information technology training has been implemented, but very little emphasis has been placed on providing cybersecurity training within the region or local jurisdictions. Training courses needed includes:
• AWR-135 Promoting Community Cyber Security
• AWR-136 Essentials of Community Cyber Security
• Critical Security Controls: Planning, Implementing and Auditing

Page 121 of 178
• Cybersecurity for Executives and Program Managers: Securely Provisioning Systems for the Future
• Cybersecurity Investigations and Network Forensics Analysis: Practical Techniques for Analyzing Suspicious Network Traffic

Exercises
Some information technology training has been implemented, but very little emphasis has been placed on exercising cybersecurity training within the region or local jurisdictions.

Page 122 of 178
Physical Protective Measures
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 6 months of completing a risk and vulnerability assessment, appropriate authorities review and update physical security plans covering 3 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities to incorporate new information from the assessment.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 6 months of completing a risk and vulnerability assessment, appropriate authorities review and update physical security plans covering 3 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities to incorporate new information from the assessment.

Capability Change Description
Physical Protective Measure capabilities have increased in the region. Several jurisdictions have purchased and installed surveillance systems at publicly managed critical infrastructures. Sustainment activities include annual risk and vulnerability assessments of critical infrastructure facilities.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Stakeholders and private partners need to be part of the planning process.

Organization
Law enforcement agencies are in need of additional personnel to support this capability.

Equipment
Security cameras are needed at critical infrastructure throughout the region as well as enhanced security protective measures.

Training
The region needs training on protecting critical infrastructure and key resources, courses include:
• MGT-452 Physical and Cybersecurity for Critical Infrastructure
• PHY-101 Performance Testing of the Protective Force
• PHY-120 Intermediate Physical Security Systems
• PHY-200 Physical Security Performance Testing of Systems
• PHY-202 Survey of Physical Security Systems

Page 123 of 178
• PER-336 Protective Measures Course

Exercises
Need increased incorporation into exercise objectives and scenarios; capability is rarely included in exercises.

Page 124 of 178
Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activities
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1-year appropriate authorities conduct a review of relevant physical and cyber threats and hazards, vulnerabilities, and strategies for risk management covering 75 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities.

An estimate of Current Capability
Every 1-year appropriate authorities conduct a review of relevant physical and cyber threats and hazards, vulnerabilities, and strategies for risk management covering 75 publicly managed and/or regulated critical infrastructure facilities.

Capability Change Description
Risk Management for Protection Programs and Activates capabilities have increased in our region. Most jurisdictions are conducting a risk vulnerability assessment of their critical infrastructure. Jurisdictions also review and update their cybersecurity policies on an annual basis. Additionally, it is now a requirement for HSGD grantees to complete the National Cyber Security Review annually.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Stakeholders and private sector partners need to be included in the planning process.

Organization
Additional personnel is needed to support risk assessments, analysis, and planning.

Equipment
N/ATraining

To support this capability, training courses needed includes:
• Community Risk Issues and Prevention Interventions
• Cultural Competence in Risk Reduction
• Executive Analysis of Community Risk Reduction

Page 125 of 178
• Fundamentals of Risk Management
Exercises
Risk Management planning is difficult to exercise. Typically this is tested in real-world situations rather than training or exercises but will be considered in future training exercises.

Page 126 of 178
Supply Chain Integrity and Security
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1 year engage 75 partner organizations involved in incident management to promote awareness of threats, dependencies, vulnerabilities, and strategies to support the restoration of private sector supply chains.

An estimate of Current Capability
Every 1 year engage 75 partner organizations involved in incident management to promote awareness of threats, dependencies, vulnerabilities, and strategies to support the restoration of private sector supply chains.

Capability Change Description
Supply Chain Integrity and Security capabilities have increased in our region. We are working with our LEPC’s, RAC, and COADS to promote awareness of threats, dependencies, vulnerabilities, and strategies. All three organizations are currently meeting on a quarterly basis.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Stakeholders and private partners need to be included in the planning process. COAD’s need to develop emergency operation plans.

Organization
Each county needs to establish an active LEPC or COAD to strengthen the security and the resilience of the supply chains.

Equipment
N/A

Training
ICS training is needed for partner organizations.

Exercises
This capability is never exercised but is needed to validate existing plans and practices.

Page 127 of 178
Community Resilience
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every [1 year], conduct [7] outreach events or activities to increase awareness of locally significant threats and hazards to help the residents be more prepared to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from those events.

An estimate of Current Capability
Every [1 year], conduct [7] outreach events or activities to increase awareness of locally significant threats and hazards to help the residents be more prepared to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from those events.

Capability Change Description
The Community Resilience capability level is increasing greatly. Jurisdictions are conduction numerous outreach events on an annual basis. Some community outreach events and activities include National Night Out, Fire Prevention Week, Skywarn Classes, Health Fairs, and Neighborhood Watch. Jurisdictions are also setting up at local events and distributing Pub Ed material when available.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Develop a regional public outreach and education plan to promote community resilience among all jurisdictions in the region.

Organization
Each county needs and active LEPC or COAD to help promote community resilience. Jurisdictions also need personnel to help facilitate outreach activities.

Equipment
Public Education material to distribute at community events.

Training
ICS training is needed for some partner organizations. Additional classes needed includes:
• E0426 Building a Roadmap to Resilience: A Whole Community Training
• G0318 Mitigation Planning for Local Governments
• MGT-402 Mitigation Planning for Rural Communities

Page 128 of 178
Exercises
Exercises that incorporate community resilience in disaster response are needed. Exercises need to also incorporate the community.

Page 129 of 178
Long-term Vulnerability Reduction
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every [1 year], [38] jurisdiction review their building codes, and, if necessary, enact or update risk-appropriate, disaster-resilient building codes.

An estimate of Current Capability
Every [1 year], [38] jurisdiction review their building codes, and, if necessary, enact or update risk-appropriate, disaster-resilient building codes.

Capability Change Description
Long-term Vulnerability Reduction capabilities are being sustained, jurisdictions are reviewing building codes and performing risk assessments on an annual basis.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Jurisdictions need to develop or Enhance hazard, threat, and or incident-specific annexes.

Organization
Building code inspectors are needed. HAM radio operators are needed. More Law Enforcement officers are needed.

Equipment
The region needs updated communication equipment, mass notification systems, and cybersecurity systems to reduce vulnerability.

Training
Need training on enhancing critical infrastructure and key resources.
• MGT-343 Disaster Management for Water and Wastewater Utilities
• MGT-345 Disaster Management for Electric Power Systems
• Tornado Awareness
• SKYWARN classes
• CODE RED training

Exercises
Page 130 of 178

Long –term vulnerability capabilities need to be included in exercises. More Communication exercises are needed region-wide.

Page 131 of 178
Risk and Disaster Resilience Assessment
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1 year after identifying threats and hazards of concern, model the impacts of 4 threat and hazard scenarios to incorporate into planning efforts.

An estimate of Current Capability
Every 1 year after identifying threats and hazards of concern, model the impacts of 4 threat and hazard scenarios to incorporate into planning efforts.

Capability Change Description
Risk and Disaster Resilience Assessment capabilities are being sustained. We are developing our regional Threat and Hazard Identification Risk Assessment on an annual basis. Our current THIRA models the impacts of 4 threat and hazard scenarios and are incorporated into regional planning efforts.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Need to involve additional internal agencies, sub-jurisdictions, neighboring jurisdictions and/or higher-level jurisdictions in the planning process.

Organization
The region needs more partner organizations involved in the risk and disaster assessment.

Equipment
N/A

Training
N/AN/A

Exercises
More exercises are needed that incorporate the impacts of the treat and hazard scenarios.

Page 132 of 178
Threats and Hazards Identification
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Every 1 year engage with 38 jurisdictions and 25 partner organizations involved in the incident management to assess the threats and hazards that are realistic and would significantly impact your communities.

An estimate of Current Capability
Every 1 year engage with 38 jurisdictions and 25 partner organizations involved in the incident management to assess the threats and hazards that are realistic and would significantly impact your communities.

Capability Change Description
Threats and Hazards Identification capabilities are being sustained. We are developing our regional Threat and Hazard Identification Risk Assessment on an annual basis. We include our partner organizations in this process.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
N/A

Organization
N/A

Equipment
N/A

Training
N/A

Exercises
N/A

Page 133 of 178
Critical Transportation
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours’ notice of an impending incident, complete the evacuation of 2000 people requiring evacuation, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring evacuation).
Within 2 hours of an incident, clear 1 miles of road affected, to enable access for emergency responders, including private and non-profit.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 2 hours’ notice of an impending incident, complete the evacuation of 2000 people requiring evacuation, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring evacuation). Within 2 hours of an incident, clear 1 miles of road affected, to enable access for emergency responders, including private and non-profit.

Capability Change Description
Critical Transportation capabilities are not exercised often, so there has been no change in capability level. However, plans do exist and are being reviewed regularly.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Review and Enhance emergency transportation plans, and establish mutual aid agreements with transportation agencies. Review and Enhance debris management plans. Include stakeholders and private partners in the planning process.

Organization
To build critical transportation capability, the region will need to have more CDL bus drivers to assist with transporting a large number of people. Smaller jurisdictions are unable to clear necessary roadways without outside assistance; therefore, debris management teams are needed. Heavy machinery operators are also needed to assist with the road clearing process.

Equipment
Page 134 of 178

More vans and busses that accommodate the access and functional needs community are needed. Heavy machinery such as tractors, dozers, and tree trimmers are needed for the road clearing process.

Training
This is a difficult capability to train on, and most rely on real-world events for practice and understanding. Classes that are needed includes:
• MGT-460 Planning for Disaster Debris Management
• IS-632 Introduction to Debris Operations
• IS-633 Debris Management Plan Development
• Emergency Transportation Operations for Disasters

Exercises
Need more realistic demonstrations of capability; exercises have been limited to tabletops and proof-of-concept.

Page 135 of 178
Environmental Response/Health and Safety
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours of an incident, assess, contain, and begin cleaning up hazardous material releases from 1 hazmat release site. Within 6 hours of a hazmat incident, complete decontamination procedures for 25 exposed
individuals (hazmat-related incidents).

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 3 hours of an incident, assess, contain, and begin cleaning up hazardous material releases from 1 hazmat release sites. Within 8 hours of a hazmat incident, complete decontamination procedures for 25 exposed individuals (hazmat-related incidents).

Capability Change Description
Environmental Response/Health and Safety capabilities have increased in our region and have been evaluated during the Red River Army Depot full-scale exercise in September 2019, as well as in the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October 2019. Clean up and decontamination procedures were evaluated in both events.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Response partners and stakeholders need to be included in the planning process.

Organization
Hazmat and Decontamination teams are needed to perform clean up and decontamination procedures.
Equipment Additional response equipment and supplies is needed for the HAZMAT team such as decontamination equipment, radiological detections devises, and PPE.

Training
This capability will never reach 100% because the requirements and standards are constantly changing. Need training on most-up-to-date procedures.

Hazardous Materials Awareness Course
Page 136 of 178
• Hazardous Materials Incident Management
• MGT-441 Mass Decontamination for Mass Casualty Incidents
• PER-272 Emergency Responder Hazardous Materials Technician for CBRNE Incidents
• PER-308 Isolation and Quarantine for Public Health and Healthcare Professionals
• PER-309 Environmental Health Training in Emergency Response Operations

Exercises
This capability will never reach 100% because the requirements and standards are constantly changing. Need exercises on health and safety monitoring/assessment, decontamination, and hazardous material response and clean-up.

Page 137 of 178
Fatality Management Services
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 24 hours of an incident, complete the recovery, identification, and mortuary services, including temporary storage services, for 20 fatalities.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 24 hours of an incident, complete the recovery, identification, and mortuary services, including temporary storage services, for 20 fatalities.

Capability Change Description
There has been no significant change in the Fatality Management Services capability, however, it has been recently exercised during the Hopkins County Disaster Drill in 2019.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Response partners need to be included in the planning process.

Organization
Personnel can fulfill this capability on a smaller scale in the larger jurisdictions, but smaller jurisdictions are not capable at all. Additional personnel is needed to provide counseling, body recover, mortuary services, and victim identification.

Equipment
Need for additional mobile morgues, body bags, remains identification tags, and other supplies to support a mass fatality.

Training
We need to implement multi-agency and/or multi-jurisdictional training to ensure stakeholders function from the same information and execute the same processes. Training courses needed includes:
• AWR-232 Mass Fatalities Planning and Response for Rural Communities
• AWR-309 Mass Fatality Planning and Response for Rural Morticians and Funeral

Directors
• Bereavement Counseling Training
• G0386 Mass Fatalities Incident Response Course

Page 138 of 178

Exercises
Need increased focus on large-scale scenarios that identify “breaking points” for capabilities; exercises have been limited to small-scale scenarios.

Page 139 of 178
Fire Management and Suppression
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of an incident, conduct firefighting operations to suppress and extinguish 5 structure fires.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 1 hour of an incident, conduct firefighting operations to suppress and extinguish 5 structure fires.
Capability Change Description Fire Management and Suppression capability are constantly increasing. This capability has been evaluated through daily operations, as well as during the City of Atlanta arson fires in
October 2019 were operations that were used to suppress and extinguish 3 structural fires that were set in the building downtown.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
N/A

Organization
More full-time firefighters needed across the regions. Due to limited funding, most departments are understaffed.

Equipment
Equipment needed to increase this capability includes:
• Thermal imaging
• Arson investigation tools
• Breathing apparatus

Training
Need to implement multi-agency and/or multi-jurisdictional training. Training courses needed includes:
• Emerging Uses for GIS in the Fire Service
• Executive Analysis of Fire Service Operations in Emergency Management
• PER-296 CBRNE Rural Response Threat Protocol

Page 140 of 178
• S-130 Firefighter Training
• S-190 Introduction to Wildland Fire Behavior Exercises
Need Fire management and Suppression exercises that incorporate multiple agencies and jurisdictions on an incident.

Page 141 of 178
Logistics and Supply Chain Management
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 12 hours of an incident, identify and mobilize life-sustaining commodities, resources, and services to 1,500 people requiring shelter and 1,500 people requiring food and water. Maintain a distribution system for 14 days.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 24 hours of an incident, identify and mobilize life-sustaining commodities, resources, and services to 1,500 people requiring shelter and 1,500 people requiring food and water. Maintain a distribution system for 7 days.

Capability Change Description
The Logistics and Supply Chain Management capability level is increasing. This capability has been evaluated on a smaller scale during the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October 2019. Commodities and resources were identified and mobilized within the first 12 hours and maintained for 13days. Jurisdictions have also participated in WebEOC training, where they were trained on submitting star requests.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Update emergency housing and shelter plans. Develop mutual aid agreements with surrounding jurisdictions.
Develop MOU agreements with private partners to provide resources and the delivery of resources.

Organization
Smaller jurisdictions are unable to meet this capability due to a lack of personnel. Additional personnel is needed to distribute essential resources.

Equipment
Generators and fuel trucks needed to support this capability, as well as mobile shelters, portable restrooms, and cots.

Training
Training that is needed to support this capability includes:

Page 142 of 178
• E0417: Mass Care/Emergency Assistance Shelter Field Guide Training
• T-420 – Shelter Operations Course
• WebEOC training

Exercises
Exercises that incorporate the resource request are needed.

Page 143 of 178
Mass Care Services
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 24 hours of an incident, provide emergency shelter, food, and water for 1,500 people requiring shelter and 1,500 people requiring food and water, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible shelter) and 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring food and water), and 200 animals requiring shelter, food, and water. Maintain for 7 days.

Within 7 days of an incident, move 300 people requiring temporary, non-congregate housing, including 25 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible, temporary, non-congregate housing), from congregate care to temporary housing.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 24 hours of an incident, provide emergency shelter, food, and water for 1,500 people requiring shelter and 1,500 people requiring food and water, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible shelter) and 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring food and water), and 200 animals requiring shelter, food, and water. Maintain for 7 days.

Within 1 month of an incident, move 300 people requiring temporary, non-congregate housing, including 25 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible, temporary, non-congregate housing), from congregate care to temporary housing.

Capability Change Description
The Housing capability level for our region has not changed. However, the City of Texarkana has been working to develop temporary and long term housing plans for residents affected in a disaster. Red Cross has also been working with jurisdictions to develop shelter plans, and identify organizations willing to shelter.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Develop shelter, temporally housing, and long term housing plans. Identify shelter locations and organizations willing to shelter. Develop commodity distribution plans and contracts to support food and water delivery. Develop MOA with private housing agencies, supply vendors.

Page 144 of 178
Organization
More personnel are needed to support the distribution of food and water. More personnel are needed to manage shelters.

Equipment
Jurisdictions will need cots, generators, and fuel trucks.

Training
Need increased private sector and/or community outreach and engagement. Training courses include:
• E0411 Mass Care/Emergency Assistance Support for Field Operations
• E0418 Mass Care/Emergency Assistance Planning and Operations
• MGT-403 Response Planning for People with Access & Functional Needs in Rural America

Exercises
Need to develop exercises focused on Mass Care operations.
Page 145 of 178

Mass Search and Rescue Operations
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 6 hours of an incident, conduct search and rescue operations for 1,500 people requiring rescue.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 6 hours of an incident, conduct search and rescue operations for 1,500 people requiring rescue.

Capability Change Description

The Mass Search and Rescue Operations capability is increasing. Several jurisdictions have purchased thermal imaging cameras to aide in operations. Although this capability has not been exercised on a large scale, search and rescue operations have been activated on smaller incidents across the region.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
A plan needs to be reviewed and updated. Response partner agencies need to be part of the planning process.

Organization
There is only one search and rescue team in the region, additional teams and personnel are needed in the region to support this capability.

Equipment
Still needing additional search and rescue equipment for a regional team such as safety ropes, harnesses, extrication tools, thermal imaging, and cadaver dogs.

Training
Still needing additional search and rescue training for the regional team as well as other local agencies. Training needed includes:
• PER-213 Wide Area Search
• Swift-water Rescue Operations Course
• PER-334 Search and Rescue in Community Disasters

Page 146 of 178
Exercises
Procedures are poorly followed at times and education of procedures and training need to take place during exercise. Regional exercises need to be held involving the search team exercise. Regional exercises need to be held involving the search team.

Page 147 of 178
On-scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 2 hours of an incident, provide security and law enforcement services to protect emergency responders and 5,000 people affected.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 3 hours of an incident, provide security and law enforcement services to protect emergency responders and 5,000 people affected.

Capability Change Description
The On-scene Security, Protection, and Law Enforcement capability levels have not changed. This capability is exercised often in the region during large special events. During these events, Law Enforcement ensures a safe/secure environment for people and communities located within the affected area.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Plans should be updated to incorporate lessons learned from real-world events.

Organization
Additional Law Enforcement officers are needed across the region.

Equipment
More mobile and portable radios are needed.

Training
More incident command training and communication training is need to address this capability.

Exercises
Need more realistic demonstrations of capability; exercises have been limited to tabletops and proof-of-concept.

Page 148 of 178
Operational Communications
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of an incident, establish interoperable communications across 38 jurisdictions affected and with 50 partner organizations involved in incident management. Maintain for 14days.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 6 hours of an incident, establish interoperable communications across 38 jurisdictions affected and with 50 partner organizations involved in incident management. Maintain for 14 days.

Capability Change Description
The Operational Communications capability level is increasing. The region conducts a monthly repeater test to all Emergency Operation Centers in the region to ensure interoperable communications. Also, we conduct an annual communication exercise each summer that documents responder’s ability to operate their mobile and portable radios, as well as access the state interoperability channels. This capability was also tested and maintained for 13 days during the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October 2019.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core
Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of
regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element,
enter N/A.

Planning
N/A

Organization
More HAM radio operators needed across the region.

Equipment
Mobile and portable radios still needed throughout the region as equipment comes to the end of
life. Radios must be purchased at a much higher rate due to the P25 requirement so only a few can be purchased at one time. Repeaters need to be replaced as some are reaching the end of life and dead spots still exist in some places. Portable towers are needed to deploy on incidents where service is limited.

Training
Additional training on radio operations, patching channels, and interloper channels are needed within the region.

Page 149 of 178
Exercises
We need to implement corrective actions and improvement plans for exercises and real-world events.

Page 150 of 178
Public Health, Healthcare, and Emergency Medical Services
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 4 hours of an incident, complete triage, begin definitive medical treatment and transfer to an appropriate facility 200 people requiring medical care.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 4 hours of an incident, complete triage, begin definitive medical treatment and transfer to an appropriate facility 200 people requiring medical care.

Capability Change Description
There has been no significant change in this capability level, however, it has been exercised on a smaller scale during the City of Texarkana Airport Exercise. To increase this capability our region will need to develop triage plans and hire a new HPP Coordinator.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps

Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Develop triage plans.
Develop MOA with outside EMS services

Organization
More EMTs are needed to handle medical triage, treatment, and transfer.

I need to hire a regional HPP coordinator.

Equipment
A triage trailer is needed in the region.

Training
SAMA training for first responders.

Exercises
More exercises are needed that focuses on triage and transferring of patients.

Page 151 of 178
Situational AssessmentSPR

Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 hour of the incident, and on a 1-hour cycle thereafter, provide notification to leadership and 20 partner organizations involved in incident management of the current and projected situation. Maintain for 7 days.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 1-hour of incident, and on a 1-hour cycle thereafter, provide notification to leadership and 20 partner organizations involved in incident management of the current and projected situation. Maintain for 7 days.

Capability Change Description
The Situational Assessment capability level has increased. This capability was tested during the Hopkins County pipeline incident in October 2019, the City of Atlanta fires in October 2019, and Red River Army Depot full-scale exercise in September 2019. This capability is exercised and evaluated during daily incidents.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Include all decision-makers in the planning process and establish how the flow of information should go.

Organization
N/A

Equipment
N/A

Training
N/A

Exercises
N/A

Page 152 of 178
Infrastructure Systems
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities

Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 2,000 customers without water service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 2,000 customers without wastewater service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 25,000 customers without communication service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 9,000 customers without electricity service.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 2,000 customers without water service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 2,000 customers without wastewater service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 25,000 customers without communication service. Within 72 hours of an incident, restore service to 9,000 customers without electricity service.

Capability Change Description
There have been no significant changes in the Infrastructure Systems capability level. This capability is strictly dependent on the incident and the capabilities of the private sectors. Planning efforts should be made to include utility, communication, and private sector providers in the planning process.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Include utility, communication and private sector providers in the planning process.

Organization
N/A

Equipment
N/A

Page 153 of 178
Training
Need training on critical infrastructure shut-offs and functionality at the local level. Training courses include:
• MGT-317 Disaster Management for Public Services
• -342 Strategic Overview of Disaster Management for Water and Wastewater Utilities
• GT-343 Disaster Management for Water and Wastewater Utilities
• MGT-345 Disaster Management for Electric Power System
• MGT-410 Business Continuity Planning for Rural Power Companies

Exercises
Need increased incorporation into exercise objectives and scenarios; capability is rarely included in exercises.

Page 154 of 178
Economic Recovery
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 month of an incident, reopen 75 businesses closed due to the incident. An estimate of Current Capability
Within 6 months of an incident, reopen 75 businesses closed due to the incident.

Capability Change Description
The Economic Recovery capability level has remained the same. However, jurisdictions are conducting annual inspections and updating building codes regularly, having these updated inspections and codes will make the process of reopening business a lot smoother. Additionally, several jurisdictions have been working with their private sectors/stakeholders on COOP plans.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.
Planning Work with the private sector and stakeholders on COOP plans.

Organization
Building inspectors are a need as well as personnel to assist with writing/reviewing businesses’ COOP plans.

Equipment
N/A

Training
Need training on continuity of operations and economic recovery. Training courses needed includes:
• Providing Post-Disaster Substantial Damage Technical Assistance to Communities
• PER-294 Testing an Emergency Operations Plan in a Rural EOC
• MGT-416 Continuity of Government Operations Planning for Rural Communities
• MGT-381 Business Continuity Planning
• Continuity of Operations Planning Program Manager Train-the-Trainer

Exercises
Tabletop exercises are needed to evaluate COOP plans.

Page 155 of 178
Health and Social Services
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 week of an incident, restore functions at 5 affected healthcare facilities and social service organizations.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 1 week of an incident, restore functions at 5 affected healthcare facilities and social service organizations.

Capability Change Description
The Health and Social Services capability level has not changed. Sustainment activities include developing and enhancing COOP plans at healthcare and critical services agencies.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Update hospital and critical social service organizations’ COOP plans.

Organization
N/A

Equipment
N/A

Training
Training needed includes:
• E0426 Building a Roadmap to Resilience: A Whole Community Training
• G0318 Mitigation Planning for Local Governments
• MGT-402 Mitigation Planning for Rural Communities

Exercises
Health and Social Services capabilities need to be incorporated into more exercises. COOP
plans need to be exercised as well.

Page 156 of 178
Housing
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 1 year of an incident, 1000 people requiring long-term housing, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible long-term housing), find and secure long-term housing.

An estimate of Current Capability
Within 1 year of an incident, 500 people requiring long-term housing, including 75 people with access and functional needs (requiring accessible long-term housing), find and secure long-term housing.

Capability Change Description
The Housing capability level for our region has not changed. However, the City of Texarkana has been working to develop temporary and long term housing plans for residents affected in a disaster.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Long term housing plans need to develop/enhanced for all jurisdictions. Private housing partners should be identified and included in the planning process.

Organization
Personnel needed to find housing for a large number of people.

Equipment
N/A

Training
Need additional training in implementing housing solutions. Additional training courses needed includes:
• Administration of Public Assistance for Community Recovery
• E0210 Recovery from Disaster: The Local Community Role
• G0282.2 Manufactured Homes and the National Flood Insurance Program
• Preparing for Post-Disaster Responsibilities
• Rapid Needs Assessment
• Recovery from Disaster: The Local Government Role

Page 157 of 178
• MGT-415 Disaster Recovery in Rural Communities
• MGT-416 Continuity of Government Operations Planning for Rural Communities

Exercises
Need increased incorporation into exercise objectives and scenarios; capability is rarely included in exercises. Future exercises should address housing shortages, housing assessments, and reconstruction/rehabilitation of damaged homes.

Page 158 of 178
Natural and Cultural Resources
SPR Step 1: Assess Capabilities
Capability Target (what the region reasonably expects to achieve in the next 3-5 years)
Within 3 months of an incident, restore 5 damaged natural and cultural resources and historic properties registered in the jurisdiction.

Estimate of Current Capability
Within 3 months of an incident, restore 5 damaged natural and cultural resources and historic properties registered in the jurisdiction.

Capability Change Description
The Natural and Cultural Resources capability level has not changed. However, in October 2019, the Hopkins County pipeline incident did affect the historic Turkey Creek properties and restoration is in process.

SPR Step 2: Describe Capability Gaps
Capability Gaps
Describe Capability Gaps in the table below, including any gaps in aspects of the Core Capability not addressed by the Capability Target statement, as appropriate. Sustainment of regional programs may be included as potential gaps. If no gaps exist for the POETE element, enter N/A.

Planning
Additional planning is needed to address damage assessment, environmental and historic preservation, and restoration.

Organization
Personnel is not capable of meeting this capability due to a lack of trained personnel. Additional trained personnel is needed across the region to conduct preliminary assessments.

Equipment
N/A

Training
Training is needed for understanding and estimating impacts on natural and cultural resources to better develop a recovery plan. Additional courses needed includes:
• AWR-156 Principles of Planning and Implementing Recovery
• E0210 Recovery from Disaster: The Local Community Role
• MGT-415 Disaster Recovery in Rural Communities
• Natural Disaster Awareness for Community Leaders

Exercises
Page 159 of 178

This capability is never exercised; future exercises should include planning for damage assessment and environmental and historic preservation.
Page 160 of 178
2020 Priorities

Top 3 Core Capabilities to Sustain in 2020
1. Planning
2. Community Resilience
3. Threats and Hazards Identification

Top 3 Core Capabilities to Build in 2020
1. Operational Communication
2. Cybersecurity
3. Housing

Page 161 of 178
Ark-Tex Council of Government
Texas Homeland Security
Strategic Plan
2015-2020
Implementation Plan for 2020
November 30, 2019

Due to the compilation of potentially sensitive data, this Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan Implementation Plan is marked FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (FOUO) when completed. This information may be exempt under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. § 552 and is protected under the provisions of Chapter 418 of the Texas Government Code. As such, anyone wishing to disseminate this document outside of the Texas State Government should contact the Ark-Tex Council of Government for disclosure review.

Page 162 of 178
PRIVACY STATEMENT
The disclosure of information in this plan could compromise the security of essential equipment, services, and systems of the Ark-Tex Council of Governments or otherwise impact the ability to carry out essential emergency responsibilities. Distribution of this document is limited to those organizations with a need to know the information in order to successfully implement the plan.

Portions of this plan may contain information that raises personal privacy issues. Those portions may be exempt from mandatory disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act. See 5 U.S.C. §552, 41 C.F.R. Part 105-60.

Any decision to disclose information in this plan outside of a Texas or Federal government entity or to withhold information in this plan from a non-Texas or Federal government entity must be coordinated with the Ark-Tex Council of Governments Executive Board.

Page 163 of 178
Ark-Tex Council of Governments
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan 2015-2020
Implementation Plan for 2020
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..4
Section I: General ………………………………………………………………………………………………..5
Section II: Preparedness Assessment……………………………………………………………………8
Section III: Concept of Implementation ………………………………………………………………..10
Page 164 of 178
Ark-Tex Council of Governments
Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan 2015-2020
Implementation Plan for 2020

FOREWORD
The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan, dated October 2015, directs that “Each Council Governments will develop an annual implementation plan [for the strategy] detailing significant regional and local implementation tasks.”

All homeland security efforts will be tracked in a statewide performance measurement system that tracks demonstrable progress toward the achievement of specific homeland security priority actions. This implementation plan is for 2020. It identifies priority actions that have clear performance measures, completion milestones, and required resources.

This homeland security implementation plan also ensures that the Ark-Tex Council of Governments are fully integrated into the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan and has identified all resources necessary to achieve homeland security preparedness goals for 2020.

Action items called for in this plan do not represent tasking from the COG nor does this plan represent a statutory mandate to individual jurisdictions or agencies.
__________________
Homeland Security Coordinator
Ark-Tex Council of Governments
Page 165 of 178

SECTION I: GENERAL
A. Purpose and Scope
This document establishes the Ark-Tex Council of Government’s Implementation Plan in support of the Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan 2015-2020. It establishes priority actions with specific performance measures to be completed by milestones established in the plan. This plan is a roadmap for our homeland security preparedness and identifies the resources required to implement the plan. Provisions of this document apply to all aspects of the region’s homeland security activities, and all jurisdictions within the region share responsibility for implementing this plan.

B. Planning Process
An ATCOG Implementation Plan Working Group was established. The ATCOG Homeland Security Advisory Committee nominated members to participate in the working group alongside ATCOG Homeland Security Program staff, all of which were Emergency Management Coordinators from across the region. This group met as necessary to complete the plan. Other subject matter experts were included as needed for information gathering purposes.

Annex A: Threat and Hazards Identification and Risk Assessment were completed first.

Annex B: State Preparedness Report was compiled after the THIRA was completed. Then the implementation
plan was completed. The completed plan was taken before the ATCOG Homeland Security Advisory Committee, as well as, the ATCOG Board of Directors for final review and approval of the document.

C. Authorities This plan is governed by the ATCOG Board of Directors, which is made up of two (2) representatives from the Texas House of Representatives, two (2) representatives from the Texas Senate, ten (10) county representatives, forty-five (45) city representatives, thirteen (13) Independent School District representatives, two (2) college representatives, and thirteen (13) Special Purpose District and Authorities representatives. Nothing in this document is intended to supersede the powers, duties, and responsibilities of the presiding officers and governing bodies of a political subdivision of the Texas Disaster Act of 1975, chapter 418, government code.

Page 166 of 178
D. Key Personnel, Position Title, Point of Contact, E-mail Address/Office Telephone, Area of
Responsibility

Homeland Security Coordinator Whitney Fezell wfezell@atcog.org
903-255-3554
Regional
Overseeing/Plan
Development/Data

Gathering EMC, City of Atlanta Robin Betts rbetts@atlantatexas.org 903.799.4062

Local Overseeing EMC, City of Texarkana Eric Schlotter eschlotter@txkusa.org
903.798.3042

Local Overseeing EMC, Lamar County Quincy Blount qblount@co.lamar.tx.us
903.491.9577

Local Overseeing EMC, City of Paris Randy Tuttle rtuttle@paristexas.gov 903.737.4130

Local Overseeing EMC, Titus County Larry McRae lmcrae@mpcity.org
903.575.4144

Local Overseeing EMC, Bowie County Jim Roberts Jim.roberts@txkusa.org
903-628-6776

Local Overseeing Judge, Cass County Becky Wilbanks casscojudge@gmail.com
903-756-5181

Local Overseeing EMC, Delta County Tanner Crutcher delta-oem@deltacountytx.com
903-395-4400

Local Overseeing EMC, Franklin County Josh Daily Jdaily@co.franklin.tx.us 903-537-4539

Local Overseeing EMC, Hopkins County Andy Endsley aendsley@hopkinscountytx.org
903-439-6217

Local Overseeing EMC, City of Sulphur Springs Jason Ricketson jricketson@sspd.us 903-885-5443

Local Overseeing EMC, Morris County Brandon Singletary Brandon.singletary@co.morris.tx.us 903-563-4103

Local Overseeing EMC, Red River County Elena Crawford elenacrawford@co.red-river.tx.us 903-427-2679

Local Overseeing

Page 167 of 178 Figure I-1. Identification of Key Personnel E. References
1. The Texas Homeland Security Strategic Plan 2015-2020, October 2015
2. State of Texas Emergency Management Plan, May 2012
3. The National Incident Management System (3rd Ed.), October 2017
4. The National Prevention Framework (2nd Ed.), June 2016
5. The National Protection Framework (2nd Ed.), June 2016
6. The National Mitigation Framework (2nd Ed.), June 2016
7. The National Response Framework (3rd Ed.), June 2016
8. The National Disaster Recovery Framework (2nd Ed.), June 2016
9. The National Preparedness Goal (2nd Ed.), September 2015
10. The National Preparedness System, November 2011
11. Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 201 (3rd Ed.), May 2018
12. Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program, April 2013
13. Department of Homeland Security Infrastructure Taxonomy Version 4.0, February 2011
14. Texas Division of Emergency Management Fiscal Year 2020 Training Calendar

Page 168 of 178
SECTION II: PREPAREDNESS ASSESSMENT
A. Regional Overview
The ATCOG region’s geography is made up a mixture of open cattle ranges on rolling hills and timber. The region has six (6) lakes and three (3) water treatment facilities, which provide the majority of the drinking water for the region. The lakes also provide recreational opportunities and four (4) of the lakes are also near State Parks. The Red River is the region’s northern border with the State of Oklahoma. The regional population is approximately 290,000 for Texas counties and approximately 334,000 if Miller County, Arkansas, is included (Miller County is a member of
ATCOG’s Board of Directors). One of the member counties, Titus County, has a higher Hispanic population than any other county in the region. The Hispanic population in Titus County is approximately 50%’, therefore, more bilingual resources are needed in this area. Educational institutions in the region, besides that of independent school districts, include two (2) universities and three (3) colleges. There are nine (9) hospitals that provide medical care to the ATCOG the population as well as numerous clinics and specialty care facilities. Several key industries in the region include timber, dairy, ranches, chicken processing plants, coal mining, trailer production, Campbell’s Soup production, Kimberly-Clark Huggies Diapers production, and the International Paper Mill. Critical Infrastructure located within the ATCOG region includes four (4) airports, four (4) power plants, natural gas pipelines with five (5) pumping stations, hydrogen sulfide wells, Interstate Highway 30 and railroad yards. Several Federally owned infrastructures located in the ATCOG region include Red River Army Depot, United States Steel Corporation, a federal courthouse, Camp Maxey, as well as Lone Star Steel.

B. Threats and Hazards
The ATCOG region is susceptible to a number of threats and hazards that can have catastrophic consequences. The major highways in our region are prime routes of travel for drug smuggling. Interstate 30 and State Highway 59 are the highest drug trafficking quarters in the region. Many individuals and organizations exist in our area that has known ties and affiliation with white supremacist groups, such as the Klu Klux Klan (KKK) and various other militant based groups. Rival American gangs, both Black and Hispanic, reside in our region. These groups have known ties across the country and ties to foreign countries. Other threats and hazards include pipelines running throughout the region. Law enforcement can’t adequately patrol and monitor all access points to the pipelines and a terrorist could cause major damage to the region by tampering with this complex system. Not only does the pipeline pose a great risk for a terrorist attack, but it also poses great hazards if malfunctioning occurs. The region has experience pipeline ruptures during this year. Technologically speaking, the region is very vulnerable to cyber threats, both identity theft and breaching of critical systems have occurred.

The primary natural hazards prevalent to the ATCOG region and more prone to occur are tornados, flash flooding, wildfires, ice storms, and high wind damage to trees and other vegetation. The most likely hazard for the ATCOG area is a tornado. The most severe tornados make appearances about every 10 years, but smaller tornados occur year-round for our region.

Recent trends include extreme drought, extreme flooding, and extreme ice storms. These seem to have cycled in recent years. This past year, though, the ATCOG region experienced extreme flooding resulting in a fatality, a minor earthquake, and small tornadoes.

Page 169 of 178
C. Capability Assessment
The ATCOG region is proficient with many of the homeland security capabilities that are applicable to the region itself with a few improvements needed in certain areas. Some capabilities will never be met at the local or regional level and completely rely on mutual aid from other regions, state or federal agencies. The ATCOG region has taken an aggressive approach to the development and sustainment of Public Information and Warning, and Community Resilience capabilities. Public Information and Warning capabilities have been limited in our region for many years; however, over the past two years, advances in this capability have been made. Some jurisdictions have purchased mass notification systems while others developed strategies to utilize social media and radio/television broadcast.

The greatest and most common gap identified during ATCOG Capability Assessment is Interoperable Communications. Due to the rural nature of the ATCOG region, most agencies have trouble communicating within their own jurisdiction.

More equipment such as repeaters, communication towers, and radios are needed to bridge the communication gaps. Improving communications capabilities, securing critical infrastructures, and obtaining first responder  training is the main focus for closing gaps for the ATCOG region in the coming year.

Page 170 of 178
SECTION III: CONCEPT OF IMPLEMENTATION

A. Overview
The ATCOG region plans to maintain all of its current homeland security capabilities in the coming years with a few improvements needed in certain areas. While the current community involvement efforts, NIMS compliance, and emergency planning are commendable, there is always room for improvement. ATCOG plans to sustain the good aspects of what is currently in place and focus our efforts on those areas needing improvement as much as possible with available funding. Securing critical infrastructure, improving communications capabilities, and enhancing first responder training are the main focus for the ATCOG the region in the coming year.

B. GOAL

1: PREVENT TERRORIST ATTACKS AND ORGANIZED CRIMINAL ACTIVITY IN TEXAS.

OBJECTIVE 1.2: Enhance investigative capability to address terrorism and criminal enterprises.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Purchased under door camera
• Purchase Thermal Imaging Goggles
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of officers trained
• Number of criminal attacks deterred
c. Implementation Tasks:
Objective 1.2 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date
Planning n/a n/a n/a n/a
Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a

Page 171 of 178
Equipment – Purchase Law – Enforcement Training – Simulator

Hopkins County SO, The City of Sulphur Springs PD / $56,845
HSGP funds October 31, 2020
Training Train on the use of equipment

Lamar County SO, The City of Sulphur Springs PD / $15,000 local
funds December 31, 2020
Exercise n/a n/a n/a n/a

OBJECTIVE 1.4: Increase public awareness and reporting of suspicious activities related to crime and terrorism, with emphasis on drug trafficking, human trafficking, and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) threats.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Neighborhood Watch Programs
• National Night Out Campaign
• Crime Stoppers Hotlines for reporting
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of legitimate reports from citizens
• Number of crimes in crime-prevalent areas
c. Implementation Tasks:

Objective 1.4 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date
Planning – Bolster existing campaigns and continue to educate the public through planning activities

Local law enforcement / $5,000 of Local funds-all 9 counties December 31, 2020
Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a
Equipment n/a n/a n/a n/a

Training – Bolster existing campaigns and continue to educate the public through planning activities
Local law enforcement /$5,000 of Local funds-all 9 counties December 31, 2020
Exercise n/a n/a n/a n/a

C. GOAL 2: REDUCE THE STATE’S VULNERABILITY TO TERRORIST AND CRIMINAL ATTACKS AND NATURAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL DISASTERS.

Page 172 of 178
OBJECTIVE 2.1: Enhance the security and resiliency of Texas critical infrastructure systems, networks, facilities, and assets, with particular emphasis on the lifeline sectors of communications, energy, transportation, water, and financial services.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Emergency Operation Plans (EOPs) updated regarding critical infrastructure security
• Improved security of perimeter through the purchase and installation of security cameras at critical locations
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of disruptions or disturbances at critical location sites
c. Implementation Tasks:
Objective 2.1 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date

Planning
Update Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs)
Local emergency management and law enforcement / $5,000 of Local funds – all 9 counties
November 30, 2020
Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a

Equipment Sustain existing security and surveillance equipment Purchase security and surveillance equipment
for other CIKR locations Local emergency management and law Enforcement
The City of Hooks PD, The City of Daingerfield PD, Lamar County EMC / $15,000 local funds / $13,566
HSGP funds December 31, 2020

September 30, 2020
Training
Train employees at critical locations how to operate equipment and respond when equipment is triggered
Local emergency management and law enforcement / $500 of Local funds September 30, 2020

Exercise
Test equipment frequently for proper functioning Local emergency management and law enforcement / $500 of Local funds December 31, 2020

OBJECTIVE 2.2: Reduce the risk of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) incidents by enhancing control and early detection capabilities.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Update hazard mitigation plans and annexes in Emergency Operations Plans
(EOPs)
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of personnel trained
• Number of CBRNE disasters
• Amount of time to respond and clear incident
c. Implementation Tasks:

Page 173 of 178
Objective 2.2 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date
Planning Update hazard
information in EOPs
Lamar County, The City of Paris / $2,500 of local funds November 30, 2020
Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a

Equipment
Order equipment to support regional HAZMAT teams Lamar County, The City of Paris / $3,495.94
HSGP funds August 31, 2020
Exercise n/a n/a n/a n/a

OBJECTIVE 2.4: Enhance the Safety of Schools in Texas.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Conducted active shooter training for school districts in the region
• Installed strong arms on doors for schools in Hopkins County
• Conducted AAIR training for law enforcement and first responders
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of personnel trained
• Amount of time to respond and clear incident
c. Implementation Tasks:
Objective 2.4 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date
Planning Update active shooter protocols in EOPs City of Paris / $2,500 of Local funds November 30, 2019
Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a

Equipment
Order equipment to support special response teams Purchase and install secure locks in schools Purchase Level 4 Vest

Lamar County, The City of Texarkana, Hopkins County, The city of Texarkana, Lamar County
City of Paris / $85,784 HSGP school funds Adopt a cop program October 31, 2019, November 30, 2019, November 30, 2019

Training
Train personnel on the proper use of equipment City of Paris Franklin County SO / $500 of local
funds $9408 HSGP November 30, 2019

August 31, 2019
Page 174 of 178

Obtain the first responder tactical training in order to establish a multiagency special response team
Obtain AAIR training for law enforcement and first responders

Stop The Bleed
Training
Mt. Vernon PD ATCOG, Hopkins County Local EMS, NETRAC No cost Texas State University
provides the training free No cost, Northeast Texas Regional Advisory Council provides
training fee September 31, 2019, December 31, 2020
Exercise n/a n/a n/a n/a

D. GOAL 3: MINIMIZE THE IMPACT OF TERRORIST AND CRIMINAL ATTACKS AND
NATURAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL DISASTERS THROUGH PROACTIVE MITIGATION
PLANNING AND PROGRAMS.

OBJECTIVE 3.1: Use mitigation planning to reduce the threats disasters pose to people, property,
and critical functions throughout the state.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Updated Hazard Mitigation Plans
• Communities and colleges are “Storm Ready”
• Sky Warn classes conducted
• Mass notification systems and early warning sirens in place
• Hosted safety seminars addressing security in local churches
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of participants in Sky Warn classes
• Number of victims and injuries posed by the natural disasters
• Number of citizens involved with mass notification systems
c. Implementation Tasks:
Objective 3.1 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date
Planning
Update Hazard
Mitigation Plans as needed ATCOG Hazard Mitigation Program / $5,000 of Local funds –
all 9 counties September 31, 2020
Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a

Page 175 of 178
Equipment
Maintain “storm ready” facilities and mass notification systems All local emergency management / $250,000 of
local funds – all 9 counties December 31, 2020

Training Conduct additional Sky Warn classes in the region National Weather Service
National Weather Service conducts training for free November 30, 2020

Exercise Conduct monthly test of systems Local emergency management / $500 of Local
funds – all 9 counties December 31, 2020

E. GOAL 4: INCREASE THE CAPABILITY OF THE STATE’S RESPONSE SYSTEM TO
MINIMIZE DAMAGE AND LOSS OF LIFE FROM TERRORIST AND CRIMINAL ATTACKS AND
NATURAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL DISASTERS. OBJECTIVE 4.3:

Achieve statewide communications operability and interoperability in Texas.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Purchased narrowband compliant and P25 compliant communications equipment
• Reprogrammed communications equipment to meet narrowband and State
Interoperability Channel Plan compliance requirements
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of first responders’ ability to communicate with others via radio
• Number of radios with interoperability channels programmed correctly
• Number of first responders’ able to operate radios properly
c. Implementation Tasks:
Objective 4.3 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date
Planning
Update Standard
Operating Procedures as necessary
Local emergency management agencies / $250 of Local
– all 9 counties December 31, 2020 Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a

Equipment
Purchase P25 compliant communications equipment
Titus County Fire Department, Mt. Vernon PD, Franklin County SO, Red River County SO (HSGP
Funds) / $36,333 of HSGP and $15,000 of local funds –
all 9 counties October 31, 2020

Training

Conduct annual communications training Local jurisdictions /Regional Partners / $5,000 of
HSGP funds – Regional August 31, 2020

Exercise
Conduct annual communications exercise ATCOG/ Local jurisdictions /Regional Partners / $5,000 of
HSGP funds – Regional August 31, 2020

Page 176 of 178
OBJECTIVE 4.5: Integrate and coordinate multiple methods to warn and keep public and local leaders informed about emergencies in their communities.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Creation of a community listserv, Twitter account, webpage, call-down list, and cable-override capabilities for all hazards information
• Mass Notification Systems in place
• Public Information Officers conduct interviews with the media and provide briefings as necessary
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of citizens included and involved with the community listserv, twitter account, webpage, call-down list, and mass notification systems
c. Implementation Tasks:
Objective 4.5 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date
Planning
Bolster existing communication avenues and continue to educate the public through planning
Local jurisdictions
/Regional Partners / $5,000 of local funds – region-wide November 30, 2020
Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a

Equipment
Maintain mass notification systems and early warning sirens ATCOG/local jurisdictions/Regional
Partners / $150,000 of local funds (all 9 counties) and $2,000 of HSGP funds (ATCOG) November 30, 2020

Training
Bolster existing communication avenues and continue to educate the public through training activities
Local jurisdictions/ Regional Partners / $1000 of local and HSGP funds regional August 31, 2020
Exercise n/a n/a n/a n/a

OBJECTIVE 4.7: Ensure access to and adequate support for homeland security and emergency preparedness and response training across all agencies, jurisdictions, and disciplines.
a. Recent Accomplishments:
• Majority of first responders have appropriate training
• Lessons from training are practiced in everyday real-life incidents
b. Performance Measures:
• Number of the First responders trained
• Number of After Action Reports for exercises and events
c. Implementation Tasks:

Page 177 of 178
Objective 4.7 Tasks Responsibility Cost/Source Completion Date
Planning n/a n/a n/a n/a
Organization n/a n/a n/a n/a
Equipment n/a n/a n/a n/a
Training
Complete training as necessary due to turnover in staff and position changes ATCOG/local jurisdictions/Regional
Partners / $10,000 regional HSGP funds August 31, 2019

Exercise
Invite all agencies to participate in training and exercises ACOG/ local jurisdiction/Regional Partners No Cost November 30, 2019

Page 178 of 178